Why did the modern left decide go from workers rights to SJW concerns?

Nov 2014
239
ph
#1
Why and when did the modern left decide to go from fighting for workers rights and things like the 8 hour working day and 2 to 3 weeks or paid leave a year to things like third wave feminism, supporting mass immigration which lowers wages generally speaking, and LGBTQIA rights? This trend is particularly pronounced in Western countries like the US or the UK with new Labour, are there still any old-fashioned labour movements in the West now that has a lot of popular support like the old Labour of the 80s? Would the SPD in Germany or the Socialists in Sweden for instance be a lot more popular if they orientated their platform towards traditional left issues in opposing managerial culture neoliberal economic policies, like what the French left still does?
 
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robto

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,903
Lisbon, Portugal
#2
Why and when did the modern left decide to go from fighting for workers rights and things like the 8 hour working day and 2 to 3 weeks or paid leave a year to things like third wave feminism and LGBTQIA rights? This trend is particularly pronounce in Western countries like the US or the UK with new Labour, are there still any old-fashioned labour movements in the West now that has a lot of popular support?
The UK Labour is returning to the "old-fashioned labour movements" under the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn.

Since when the "New Labour" (I mean the Labour party from Tony Blair to Corbyn) was a champion of "SJW politics"?! They were nothing but pro-business, pro-big money kind of political party that completely betrayed the working class (either white, brown or black). They touched some "progressive social policies" to gather some voters, but they were a party of big business and Neo-liberalism.
 
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robto

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,903
Lisbon, Portugal
#3
Would the SPD in Germany or the Socialists in Sweden for instance be a lot more popular if they orientated their platform towards traditional left issues in opposing managerial culture neoliberal economic policies, like what the French left still does?
SPD is a dead political party as far as I'm concerned. The Socialist party in Sweden is an establishment party and the country is already a fairly socialistic and working-class friendly society - their only contentious political issue at the moment is immigration and Russia's encroachment, all the class struggle issues seems to be already settled.

There are other main European political forces oriented towards a more radical left-wing ideology - you have Syriza in Greece, Sinn Fein in Ireland and PODEMOS in Spain.
 
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pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
8,330
#4
Why and when did the modern left decide to go from fighting for workers rights and things like the 8 hour working day and 2 to 3 weeks or paid leave a year to things like third wave feminism, supporting mass immigration which lowers wages generally speaking, and LGBTQIA rights? This trend is particularly pronounced in Western countries like the US or the UK with new Labour, are there still any old-fashioned labour movements in the West now that has a lot of popular support like the old Labour of the 80s? Would the SPD in Germany or the Socialists in Sweden for instance be a lot more popular if they orientated their platform towards traditional left issues in opposing managerial culture neoliberal economic policies, like what the French left still does?
I just don't agree with the assumptions of the OP.

this is just the success of propaganda from the right which actually campaigns about identity politics much more than the left.
 

Sindane

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,630
Europe
#5
Why and when did the modern left decide to go from fighting for workers rights and things like the 8 hour working day and 2 to 3 weeks or paid leave a year to things like third wave feminism, supporting mass immigration which lowers wages generally speaking, and LGBTQIA rights? This trend is particularly pronounced in Western countries like the US or the UK with new Labour, are there still any old-fashioned labour movements in the West now that has a lot of popular support like the old Labour of the 80s? Would the SPD in Germany or the Socialists in Sweden for instance be a lot more popular if they orientated their platform towards traditional left issues in opposing managerial culture neoliberal economic policies, like what the French left still does?

Good question

The UK Labour is returning to the "old-fashioned labour movements" under the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn.

Since when the "New Labour" (I mean the Labour party from Tony Blair to Corbyn) was a champion of "SJW politics"?! They were nothing but pro-business, pro-big money kind of political party that completely betrayed the working class (either white, brown or black). They touched some "progressive social policies" to gather some voters, but they were a party of big business and Neo-liberalism.
:lol: You have got to be joking.

Take a look at Corbyns social media pages. He cares more about Syrian refugees, than the British working class. Cares more about Palestine, than Barnsley, Rochdale or Wolverhampton and more about pushing identity politics than everyday peoples concerns in this country.
 

robto

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,903
Lisbon, Portugal
#6
Good question



:lol: You have got to be joking.

Take a look at Corbyns social media pages. He cares more about Syrian refugees, than the British working class. Cares more about Palestine, than Barnsley, Rochdale or Wolverhampton and more about pushing identity politics than everyday peoples concerns in this country.
Social media pages are not political programs. Most of his social media tweets are about commenting recent news developments, so that's normal that in some instances he posts things about Palestine when something "hot" is happening there.

Read the political party manifesto, see the party's political campaigns and see which kind of policies they are supporting in the parliament.
 
Oct 2013
1,283
Monza, Italy
#7
Why and when did the modern left decide to go from fighting for workers rights and things like the 8 hour working day and 2 to 3 weeks or paid leave a year to things like third wave feminism, supporting mass immigration which lowers wages generally speaking, and LGBTQIA rights? This trend is particularly pronounced in Western countries like the US or the UK with new Labour, are there still any old-fashioned labour movements in the West now that has a lot of popular support like the old Labour of the 80s? Would the SPD in Germany or the Socialists in Sweden for instance be a lot more popular if they orientated their platform towards traditional left issues in opposing managerial culture neoliberal economic policies, like what the French left still does?
After the end of "Keynes consensus" (which endured till the end of the '70s and was shared by both left wing and right wing parties, consisting in high public expense, inflation and the accepted public debt), the advent of Chinese influence in the global economic order - with its low wages competition- things changed a lot, old parameters aren't good enough to interpret 21th century issues which are different from those of the 20th century period. It's easy to blame the former "socialist" politicians who have embraced free-market...as it's easy to blame "neo-liberalism" (many people who do it don't have a clear idea of what they're talking about, especially here in Italy) but you must at least consider all these historical above and conclude that, like it or not, it's very difficult to be a left wing politician nowadays. Neo-liberalism (Chicago school, Milton Friedman) put in practice may have a lot of flaws - see Washington consensus - especially if taken as a dogma, but Keynesian parameters seem to me very outdated. Also add that the average worker benefits from living standards which are better than those of 50-100 years ago when socialist parties and movements developed. To blend social justice (workers rights) and social welfare with free enterprise isn't a joke anymore like 30-40 years ago, although I believe it's the best thing to do (at least in an ideal world).

As for the modern left embracing the rights of the immigrants, there are many levels on which this can be demonstrated...from obsessive political correctness to reasonable reclaims; of course there may have been electoral reasons for which left-wing politicians embrace femminism (women's vote, also those of the middle/ middle-higher-class) as well as sincere idealism.
 
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Jul 2016
8,184
USA
#8
Why and when did the modern left decide to go from fighting for workers rights and things like the 8 hour working day and 2 to 3 weeks or paid leave a year to things like third wave feminism, supporting mass immigration which lowers wages generally speaking, and LGBTQIA rights? This trend is particularly pronounced in Western countries like the US or the UK with new Labour, are there still any old-fashioned labour movements in the West now that has a lot of popular support like the old Labour of the 80s? Would the SPD in Germany or the Socialists in Sweden for instance be a lot more popular if they orientated their platform towards traditional left issues in opposing managerial culture neoliberal economic policies, like what the French left still does?
The Origins of Political Correctness
 

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,484
Dispargum
#10
Can't speak about other countries, but in the US, many aspects of the New Deal/Great Society/welfare state proved ultimately self-defeating. The welfare state and Keynsian Consensus were very successful at elevating liberal voters from the ranks of the poor and working class into the middle class. But then these new middle class voters starting voting more conservatively. As the middle class shifted from the Democratic Party to the Republicans, the Democrats logically catered to those voters who remained - increasingly these were women and minorities. One growing voter block for the Democrats was that of urban college-educated professionals. This block has little in common with the poor and working class. Urban professionals have more sympathy for women and minorities than they do for lower class workers. I'm not exactly sure why.
 

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