Why did the nazi abandon the offensive at Kursk?

Sep 2012
8,959
India
#41
German Army didnt forced Tsarist army to surrender. There were no Tsar when Germany seized Ukraine. Russian army was demoralized and weakened already in 1917 after overthrow of the Tsar and abolition of officer's authority in the army. In 1918 after Bolsheviks coming to power Russian Army deserted fully. Only because of this Germany could seized Ukraine.

Undoubtedly Tsar's Army was weaker than German's in 1:1 fight. But in 1917 Russian Army was strengther than German's East part in the case when there was no revolution. In the winter 1916-1917 Tsar's government prepared final offensive for summer of 1917 which had to crush Germany and to finish war to the end of 1917. This offensive even was undertaken by Revolution's command. But it wasnt well prepared due to revolutionary mess. And it failed because of this reason and because of catastrophic fall of discipline.
By Tsarist Army, I meant the Russian Army. Let us not quibble on a minor point. I want to state here that the entire Operation Barbarossa was an utterly misconceived adventure that was bound to go wrong for the Germans. It mattered little for the Germans whether they had Tiger and Panther tanks or not
for the Kursk battle. They had lost on the eastern front, as a whole, from 15th October 1941, when the Soviet Army started to defend Moscow vigorously as the Vozhd ( the boss) had decided to stay on in Moscow. The tide turned thereafter.
 
Dec 2017
789
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#42
They had lost on the eastern front, as a whole, from 15th October 1941, when the Soviet Army started to defend Moscow vigorously as the Vozhd ( the boss) had decided to stay on in Moscow. The tide turned thereafter.
The turning point on the Eastern Front was the battle of Stalingrad (Volgograd). If Soviets lost the battle they would have been cut off from oil supply coming from Azerbaijan via Caspian sea and Volga River. In those days Azerbaijan was providing oil for the country.

Possible battles of Rzhev (Moscow and vicinity) which was the bloodiest on the eastern front and possibly WWII. There were 4 offensive operations with more than 2mln casualties in Red Army by some estimates. Twice as many as in Stalingrad. 1943 was the turning point. Red Army won Stalingrad, Rzhev, Kursk battles.
 
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sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,351
Sydney
#43
The whole operation was going nowhere , the North pincer under Model had been stopped at Ponyir ,
he had a two soviet fronts attack at his back which had broken a fifty km hole in his line and had to withdraw units from the attack to plug it
there was no more bite on the North pincer

the South pincer also was checked , GrossDeutchland division was advancing by small steps with heavy losses
the 2nd SS corps attempt at a left hook across the River Spiel was taking a drubbing
this was Totenkopf division attempt to hold a bridgehead across the Speil river under a massive artillery plummeting
they were holding by their fingernails loosing a lot of men
the flank was guarded by Manstein who had fought Rotmistrov 5th guard tank army to a stop with very heavy losses for 5th TA

with Italy imminent collapse , losses mounting and the Soviet front igniting in other places , it was time to call it quit
Manstein stood his position for three days but evacuated Totenkopf straight away from their exposed position .
His claim later in his book "lost victories " of an imminent success is the usual German general post war rubbish to make them looks good
Hitler was right not to want this operation and right to stop it