Why did the Plantagenets want to rule France? When they already had Ireland and England to rule?

Apr 2017
648
Lemuria
#11
Why did House Plantagenet want to rule France?
There is a reason why their "empire" is called the Angevin empire rather than the English empire. Angevin means from Anjou, France. They were also dukes of Aquittaine through Eleanor. With Anjou and Aquittaine as theirs, taking France was just the next logical machiavellian step.
 
Last edited:

Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
4,949
#13
I have strong doubts of this, for this mentioned period. Have you a source to back up this claim?
It was extremely well managed, with extreme amounts of minted silver in circulation, which tended to mean Anglo Saxon rulers had ample recourse to funds for projects.

That's not to say it was richer than any other place in absolute terms. But in relative terms the Anglo-Saxon rulers were staggeringly well heeled compared to most other rulers at the time.

Which was part of why the Norsemen, the Danes in particular, so consistently targeted it. And the amount of minted silver extracted by it over time pretty staggering. The Scandinavian realization of HOW rich the Englanders were also led to attempts to locally reform administration, trade and taxation, in particular by the Danish kings. The kings of Denmark tried to found several little "Londons" in Denmark and what is today southern Sweden, clearly noticing what a huge benefit a large, rich urban trading hub like that was. Never really worked, but not for want of ambition.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
4,720
Portugal
#14
It was extremely well managed, with extreme amounts of minted silver in circulation, which tended to mean Anglo Saxon rulers had ample recourse to funds for projects.

That's not to say it was richer than any other place in absolute terms. But in relative terms the Anglo-Saxon rulers were staggeringly well heeled compared to most other rulers at the time.

Which was part of why the Norsemen, the Danes in particular, so consistently targeted it. And the amount of minted silver extracted by it over time pretty staggering. The Scandinavian realization of HOW rich the Englanders were also led to attempts to locally reform administration, trade and taxation, in particular by the Danish kings. The kings of Denmark tried to found several little "Londons" in Denmark and what is today southern Sweden, clearly noticing what a huge benefit a large, rich urban trading hub like that was. Never really worked, but not for want of ambition.
So, in your perspective, Warwolf's sentence was incorrect.

Interesting post, a couple of things here that I didn't knew, thanks.
 

Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
4,949
#15
So, in your perspective, Warwolf's sentence was incorrect.

Interesting post, a couple of things here that I didn't knew, thanks.
Well, I don't think Anglo Saxon England was objectively richer than many other parts of Europe, no. But that there is a longer history of England being administratively better managed than almost any other realm one might care to name. And that put more money and power directly in the hands of Medieval English kings than say the kings of France, even when France was magnitudes larger and richer.
 

Willempie

Ad Honorem
Jul 2015
4,602
Netherlands
#16
Anglo-Saxon England was the richest country in Europe. It was so wealthy it paid millions of Danegeld to the Vikings to keep them away. It was also the first-time country in Europe.
Normandy alone yielded a little less income than England at 1/3 of the people. At the end of the 12th century it even surpassed it.
And we aren't even discussing Anjou and Aquitaine, which were quite rich lands as well. It is also why the Plantagenet treasury was in Chinon (Anjou).

In fact France was probably the richest area in Europe, due to its fertile grounds and ores.
 
Likes: macon

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,599
Sydney
#18
the Angevin were French , and didn't care much about England ,
Normandy , Anjou and above all Aquitaine were richer , better placed and closer to their heart
Richard wanted Aquitaine above anything else and spend a few weeks altogether in the sad dismally wet island
its main attractions was a crown and a suitably hated place of exile for Eleanor
Henri was always fighting on the continent , rarely turning up on the other side of the Channel
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,282
Brassicaland
#19
There is a reason why their "empire" is called the Angevin empire rather than the English empire. Angevin means from Anjou, France. They were also dukes of Aquittaine through Eleanor. With Anjou and Aquittaine as theirs, taking France was just the next logical machiavellian step.
It might sound logical for the English (Normans at this point technically; Richard the Lionheart did not speak any "Middle English"; if this was the local language of England at the time) to take over the fragmented "France" before Phillipe Augustus.
Why was Phillipe Augustus much more powerful and effective than previous French kings?
 

Willempie

Ad Honorem
Jul 2015
4,602
Netherlands
#20
It might sound logical for the English (Normans at this point technically; Richard the Lionheart did not speak any "Middle English"; if this was the local language of England at the time) to take over the fragmented "France" before Phillipe Augustus.
Why was Phillipe Augustus much more powerful and effective than previous French kings?
Mainly because the royal lands were under control, courtesy of his father and grandfather (and the often skimped expulsion of Jews). He himself got Hainaut with his marriage.
But mind you it was only after the Plantagenet collapse that he really was effective with the added lands. Before that he was mainly intriguing, albeit very successful.
 

Similar History Discussions