Why did the Southeastern US's population grow much faster than the interior South's?

Sep 2012
1,042
Tarkington, Texas
#11
For many years there were Texas Land certificates circulating in Europe. The land was not great, but in Europe, large acreage was attractive. That is how many Texas communities came about. I met a lady from the "Polish Capital of Texas" at my table one night at the casino. I read a story about a small emigrant community South of San Antonio. They were Catholic so they did not mind being in Hispanic Texas, but they did have a great fear of the local Rattlesnakes! During a town meeting in the local Catholic Church a three foot long Rattler fell from the eaves and joined the meeting!



When Texas was be settled by Americans most of the state was tied up by Land Grants given to Pioneer families to come in and settle. There were also large grants from as far back as the Spanish. This is the main reason why there is so little land being held by the Federal Government.



Before Air Conditioning, people often vacationed on the coast or mountains during the hot months. If your home was cool and dark it helped! The French favored using adobe walls on the insides of homes to insulate them. Before the mid sixties, my family only had a small a/c window unit in my parent's bedroom. The rest of us had to make do with Attic fans and big Window fans. Any breeze was appreciated!



Pruitt
 
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Jan 2010
4,439
Atlanta, Georgia USA
#12
You all have given some very good reasons. My personal (and biased) opinion is that the coastal states are just places where more people want to live. My spouse and I have often looked at moving from Atlanta. If we were to move to one of the eastern states, it would probably be to the Chesapeake Bay area, not to Alabama or the states along the Mississippi.

The availability of air conditioning explains why people moved to the South in the last fifty years or so--and I think it is a big factor--but not why people moved to the Southeast.

I also think the reputational issue is big: we moved from the North, where it was generally believed (and still may be) that treatment of African-Americans was worse in Alabama and Mississippi. That's an artifact of coverage of the Civil Rights years and not true, but it's big factor IMO.
 
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royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,485
San Antonio, Tx
#13
When Texas was be settled by Americans most of the state was tied up by Land Grants given to Pioneer families to come in and settle. There were also large grants from as far back as the Spanish. This is the main reason why there is so little land being held by the Federal Government.

Pruitt
The reason there is little land owned by the Federal government is that Texas may be one of the few, perhaps the only state whose public lands are owned by the state and not by the Federal government. This is how the Texas government paid for its state Capitol (in 1888) which was paid for with public land and which was the beginning of some of Texas’ most famous ranches.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
19,933
SoCal
#14
You all have given some very good reasons. My personal (and biased) opinion is that the coastal states are just places where more people want to live. My spouse and I have often looked at moving from Atlanta. If we were to move to one of the eastern states, it would probably be to the Chesapeake Bay area, not to Alabama or the states along the Mississippi.

The availability of air conditioning explains why people moved to the South in the last fifty years or so--and I think it is a big factor--but not why people moved to the Southeast.
Makes sense.

I also think the reputational issue is big: we moved from the North, where it was generally believed (and still may be) that treatment of African-Americans was worse in Alabama and Mississippi. That's an artifact of coverage of the Civil Rights years and not true, but it's big factor IMO.
Were Blacks in Louisiana also treated worse than Blacks in Georgia?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
19,933
SoCal
#15
For many years there were Texas Land certificates circulating in Europe. The land was not great, but in Europe, large acreage was attractive. That is how many Texas communities came about. I met a lady from the "Polish Capital of Texas" at my table one night at the casino. I read a story about a small emigrant community South of San Antonio. They were Catholic so they did not mind being in Hispanic Texas, but they did have a great fear of the local Rattlesnakes! During a town meeting in the local Catholic Church a three foot long Rattler fell from the eaves and joined the meeting!
Are you still talking about the Texan Poles here?

BTW, I don't think that Texas was particularly Hispanic in the early 20th century. It was only something like 11.5% Hispanic in 1940. It was only later that the Hispanic population there significantly increased.

When Texas was be settled by Americans most of the state was tied up by Land Grants given to Pioneer families to come in and settle. There were also large grants from as far back as the Spanish. This is the main reason why there is so little land being held by the Federal Government.
Makes sense.

Before Air Conditioning, people often vacationed on the coast or mountains during the hot months. If your home was cool and dark it helped! The French favored using adobe walls on the insides of homes to insulate them. Before the mid sixties, my family only had a small a/c window unit in my parent's bedroom. The rest of us had to make do with Attic fans and big Window fans. Any breeze was appreciated!
Which part of Texas did you live in back then?
 
Sep 2012
1,042
Tarkington, Texas
#16
I have lived most of my life about 23 miles East of the Sabine River. I moved in with one of my daughters four years ago. Now I live in scenic Tarkington, Texas. There is little difference in climate from Lake Charles, LA and say, Beaumont, Texas. My Grandfather raised my Father in a company house on piers in what was called the old Sulphur Mines. The Feds bought it up for a Strategic Oil Reserve. I used to be able to drive out there as a Teenager. My Granddad was once the bookkeeper out there. Nowadays he would be called the Plant Manager. For as long as I can remember Dad had a little window unit in the bedroom. He and Mom would spend as much time in there as they could. We did not get a big window unit until I was about 10 or so. Us kids would then spend a lot of time inside! Quite a few neighborhood kids came over as well. Most of the neighbor hood kids would go out into the weather early in the day and not come back until dark. My Brother and I learned quick that it was better not to be noticed by Dad! He thought we should be doing something productive. As we got older we could play Football and Baseball all day.

You don't see that anymore..

I read a lot of history. There is more to read in Texas.

Pruitt
 
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Sep 2012
1,042
Tarkington, Texas
#18
Daughter kicked her husband out and she, two sons and I moved to scenic Tarkington. They are about 45 minutes apart. Like most of the coast areas along the Texas and Louisiana coasts, they do not drain. I grew up in Lake Charles, LA and most of my adult life in Sulphur, LA.

Pruitt
 
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Jun 2017
2,891
Connecticut
#19
The most common trend in human history is people living near oceans and rivers where there were ports(food and water, access to trade etc). It's why America's coasts are so densely populated while our interior is so empty. It's starting to change a little now but that's cause increases in technology(whether it be the industrial one or the technological one) make the distinction between living on the water and living inland more irrelevant(take Chicago in the 20th century versus Chicago in the 19th century). The coasts still have massive built in advantages from those centuries and millenia of humanity setting up places that way.

It's one of the reasons sea level rise from climate change is such a threat wouldn't cover most of the Earth's surface but the area it would cover just happens to be the area where the earth's people have always predominantly lived.
 
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Sep 2012
1,042
Tarkington, Texas
#20
Don't forget the Midwest grain trade was able to reach the Eastern Seaboard once the Erie Canal was dug. Much of Midwest trade also went to New Orleans.
 
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