Why did WW2 Japan adopt a rimless, British .303?

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Aug 2016
977
US&A
#1
According to the Wikipedia page, the Japanese were impressed by the German 8mm rounds and so decided to adopt a rimless 7.7mm (.303) caliber. I have also heard the Japanese wanted a stronger round for better anti-material qualities.

The 7.7mm Japanese round is ballistically identical to the British .303. People who own firearms and reload their own ammunition find the bullets are interchangeable. The Japanese even used an identical, rimmed, copy of the .303 for their heavily British-influenced machine guns, and a semi-rimmed version for other machine guns and certain rifles.

It seems like they could've just as easily copied the German 7.92mm, the Italian 7.35mm, the Spanish 7mm, or designed a more powerful rimless round based off the Japanese 6.5mm.

Why copy a round off an empire they hated?
 
Jul 2016
9,323
USA
#3
Japanese had copied some British machine guns to use in aircraft and naval surface ships (like the Type 92 machine gun). Because they copied the MGs that fired a rimmed cartridge, they needed to copy the ammo too.

The Japanese problem was they developed three different 7.7 cartridges, all used in different MGs. Rimmed, semi-rimmed, and rimless. They were not interchangeable, and there were even types that came oiled or non-oiled, further complicating logistics.
 
Jul 2016
9,323
USA
#9
You understand the only difference between the Japanese rimless 7.7 and the British .303 is the rim right?
First, that is wrong. If you think the only different between 7.7x56mmR and 7.7x58mm Arisaka is the rim, then I wonder why you're making any declarative statements at all.

"Why copy a round off an empire they hated?"

They didn't copy a rimless round. They, being the IJN, copied the rimmed round to use in their versions of British machine guns. Then the IJA, a completely different organization, changed their standard calibers from 6.5 to 7.7 because of range issues and perceived issues with terminal ballistics encountered in China in the 30s, and they too went 7.7, choosing a bullet caliber already in Japanese arsenals, that they'd already done testing on and already had various bullets for.
 
Mar 2019
1,244
Kansas
#10
You understand the only difference between the Japanese rimless 7.7 and the British .303 is the rim right?
You do understand how appallingly useless Japanese machine guns were. That's why I questioned the British design comment. As for the rest of your post. That's really not my wheelhouse so I would prefer others to engage in that part of the discussions.
 
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