Why did WW2 Japan adopt a rimless, British .303?

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Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,367
T'Republic of Yorkshire
Do you disagree with the idea that people are less likely to use things associated with groups they hate, or that the pre-1941 Japanese hated the British?
Individuals maybe. States, no. And even in the case of individuals, mostly no. See below.

I can see now that the term "hate" is a stronger word than I thought. I simply used it because I am talking about a period just before Japan and Britain went to war.

I do think that the Japanese had more gain by joining the axis than joining the allies, or staying neutral, but I have no reason to think that they didn't also have significantly more to lose by joining a side that was vastly inferior in resources. However, It seems apparent to me that "international statesmen" as you say, are just as human as the rest of us, and prone to mistakes based on flawed logic and reason that usually come down to emotional matters such as feeling left out. This goes doubly for the military clique ruling Japan at the time. I do think they at least, "strongly disliked" Britain for various reasons, most especially the peace terms of WW1 that they felt ripped-off by.
The Japanese took note of the British attack on the Italian fleet at Otranto, liked what they saw and copied it. The fact that they were potential enemies had nothing to do with it.

The British liked the design of German jerry-cans so much that they tried to get a hold of them and used them whenever they could instead of their own designs.

The Germans were so impressed with the British Mosquito that they tried to develop their own version of it.
 

botully

Ad Honorem
Feb 2011
3,546
Amelia, Virginia, USA
Rommel’s famous goggles, even called “Rommel goggles” now, were in fact British issue.
 
Aug 2016
977
US&A
Individuals maybe. States, no. And even in the case of individuals, mostly no. See below.



The Japanese took note of the British attack on the Italian fleet at Otranto, liked what they saw and copied it. The fact that they were potential enemies had nothing to do with it.

The British liked the design of German jerry-cans so much that they tried to get a hold of them and used them whenever they could instead of their own designs.

The Germans were so impressed with the British Mosquito that they tried to develop their own version of it.
All of which are things that provided a significant advantage in warfare.
 

Tercios Espanoles

Ad Honorem
Mar 2014
6,679
Beneath a cold sun, a grey sun, a Heretic sun...
Wasn't it Britain which supplied the bulk of the engineering and technical muscle when Japan industrialized?
 

aggienation

Ad Honorem
Jul 2016
9,813
USA
LOL, what can I say?
You can say "Thanks Aggie, I wasn't aware that Japan was a member of the Entente alliance during WW1, and was actually an ally of Britain, and wasn't screwed over with the other Central Powers, instead benefited from the losses of Germany and other Central Powers, and thus didn't have cause to hate Britain, as my previous posts obvious alluded to. Nice to learn new info!"

Instead, you're flipping out about other people's comments as if they are offending you in a personal way. What happened?
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,367
T'Republic of Yorkshire
All of which are things that provided a significant advantage in warfare.
Oh, so they only do it if it provides ab advabntage in war?

The Japanese hated the British and Americans, right? Because they were at war, yes?

Well, you know there was one particular sport played in Japan throughout the war, apart from in 1945. You know what that sport was? Baseball. Now, tell me, if they hated the Allies so much, why would they do that? What advantage in warfare does baseball give?

In fact, show me ONE example where "hate" was a factor in a country not adopting something when they could have.
 
Aug 2016
977
US&A
Oh, so they only do it if it provides ab advabntage in war?

The Japanese hated the British and Americans, right? Because they were at war, yes?

Well, you know there was one particular sport played in Japan throughout the war, apart from in 1945. You know what that sport was? Baseball. Now, tell me, if they hated the Allies so much, why would they do that? What advantage in warfare does baseball give?

In fact, show me ONE example where "hate" was a factor in a country not adopting something when they could have.
LOL, Baseball was the one western sport so popular they couldn't ban it. They just replaced all the words with japanese equivalents.

How about all the sports they did ban?
 
Mar 2019
1,958
Kansas
In fact, show me ONE example where "hate" was a factor in a country not adopting something when they could have.
Hehe - you fell for that one :)

Germany banned all Jewish based physics in the lead up to WW2. Set their atomic program back a generation..........thankfully
 
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Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,367
T'Republic of Yorkshire
LOL, Baseball was the one western sport so popular they couldn't ban it. They just replaced all the words with japanese equivalents.

How about all the sports they did ban?
You mean like rugby - oh no, wait, that was actually played during the war.

Football? Played right up until 1940, when the war suspended it. The Japanese even included teams from occupied territories into their own league.

Figure skating? To 1941.

Golf? Same.

None of these sports were banned. A number of national championships and tournaments weren't held due to the war, but they continued to be played.

So which ones did they ban?
 
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