Why did WW2 Japan adopt a rimless, British .303?

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Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
33,651
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#61
I used the term "hate" because that is how nation's and people willing to kill each other think. I don't care if you don't like it, that is the term 99% of people would use to describe how opposing nation's view each other just prior-to and during war time.
No, it isn't. That may be the case for some individuals, but "nations" don't "think" that way. War leaders, as a general rule, are far more practical than you seem to think.

So far, despite being challenged to do so multiple times, you've failed to demonstrate any instance where your assertion that nations that supposedly "hate" one another have deliberately eschewed elements of the other nation's technology, practices and even culture. I'e given you multiple examples of where they have. Now it's your turn to demonstrate where they haven't.
 
Jul 2016
9,307
USA
#62
They were about to start killing each other. What term do you want me to use? They weren't friends Naomasa!
Going to war doesn't mean hating the opponent. Besides that obvious bit of info, nations aren't supposed to have friends at all, only allies, who share interests, even if only very temporarily. Japan and Britain were allies when the .303 British round was copied by the Japanese.

That's it. That answered your OP and you don't need to be posting about this anymore.
 
Aug 2016
977
US&A
#65
Going to war doesn't mean hating the opponent. Besides that obvious bit of info, nations aren't supposed to have friends at all, only allies, who share interests, even if only very temporarily. Japan and Britain were allies when the .303 British round was copied by the Japanese.

That's it. That answered your OP and you don't need to be posting about this anymore.
Hate means hostility. Going to war isn't a hostile act?

Also, this is, amusingly enough, irrelevant to the post anyway. Since I was asking about the rimless version of the cartridge. Try to keep up.
 
Jul 2016
9,307
USA
#66
Hate means hostility. Going to war isn't a hostile act?

Also, this is, amusingly enough, irrelevant to the post anyway. Since I was a king about the rimless version of the cartridge. Try to keep up.
Look bro, you wrote hate. You wrote dislike. You wrote all the rest of the synonyms too. You wrote all that mess trying to understand why Japan would adopt something from an enemy, which was only copying a rimmed cartridge. You ranting about rimless means nothing, because the Japanese never copied a rimless cartridge. So again, we found another error in your OP. On top of the biggest:

JAPAN AND BRITAIN WERE NOT ENEMIES AT THE TIME
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
33,651
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#67
The definition of hate is, "To feel strong dislike for or hostility toward". How would you define it?
Actually, the definition is NOT merely "feel hostility" or "strong dislike". It is *intense* dislike, aversion or hostility.

Antagonism between nations, even resulting in war, does not imply hatred.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
33,651
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#68
Look bro, you wrote hate. You wrote dislike. You wrote all the rest of the synonyms too. You wrote all that mess trying to understand why Japan would adopt something from an enemy, which was only copying a rimmed cartridge. You ranting about rimless means nothing, because the Japanese never copied a rimless cartridge. So again, we found another error in your OP. On top of the biggest:

JAPAN AND BRITAIN WERE NOT ENEMIES AT THE TIME
And with that, this thread is done.
 
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