Why didn't Britain and France enter the Russo-Japanese War?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,960
SoCal
#81
The US viewed the allaince as potemntial encouraging rather than restrianing (IMHO) . US really saw China as a pretty important interests and the open door policy was one meant to favour US interests.
Did Japan ever oppose the Open Door Policy in regards to China before 1931?
 

pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
9,341
#82
Did Japan ever oppose the Open Door Policy in regards to China before 1931?

Well 1915 and the 21 demands springs to mind.

Twenty-One Demands - Wikipedia

"On the other hand, the United States expressed strongly negative reactions to Japan's rejection of the Open Door Policy. In the Bryan Note issued by Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan on 13 March 1915, the U.S., while affirming Japan's "special interests" in Manchuria, Mongolia and Shandong, expressed concern over further encroachments to Chinese sovereignty"
 
Likes: Futurist

pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
9,341
#83
I think you're wrong there: the Australians and New Zealanders were all in favour of the AJA - the only Dominion that was opposed was Canada.
After a little more checking, you're right. I am wrong on this point, thanks.

Austrian Prime Mister Billy Hughes had been pretty vocal in the rejection of the Japanese Racial equality bill at the Paris conference in 1919. The Austrlian Hystria about the "Yellow Peril" , the White Australia policy and reading Dominion opposition lead me to add 2 + 2 + 2 = 7.



"with the first post war Imperial conference being held in 1921. Their puprose was a unified international poicy for the Empire. The Extension of the Anglo-Japanese Alliance was a major Item on the Agenda. Perhaps for the first time in these Imperial Conferences , major differences arose. The Canadian Prime Minister Arthur Meighan , was firmly opposed to the continutaion of the Anglo-Japanese Allainice in it;s cuyrrnet form. He was concerned that a conflict could develop between Japan and the United States and was determined that the Empire should avoid being caught in a war between the two nations as a result of the Alliance. Indeed the United States had been critical of the Alliance,as it meant Britain encouraged Japan's expansion in the Far East and also preserved the United Kingdom's trade and financial interests especially in China

At the beginning of the conference all other members including Australia, had supported the immediate renewal of the Anglo-Japanese Alliance but, as discussion continued, more and mopre problems were seen with that course of action. Australia would have liked the Allaince to continue while it sought to biuld up Naval resources of it's own. Hughes believed that the Alliance was indispensable to the security of Austria as it gave Great Britain a means to restrict an ambitious ally. Yet Hughes also knew the Allaince was anathema to the United States and that support from Washington would be necessary should the Japanese become belligerent. Hughes's strategy was to advocate for the renewal of the Alliance, but in a form acceptable to Britain, America and Japan. From outside the Imperial Conference the US view had been made very clear. The United States had obliviously influenced Canada significantly Amrica feared that the treaty would lead to a Japanes-dominated market in the Pacific and close china off from American trade. The issue became too difficult and the Imperial Conference decided to shelve the Allainace, which was put aside in favour of courting America's favour. A decison regardng the Allaince would eventually be made in the signing of the Four-Power Treaty at the Washington Conference."

Dangerous Allies
By Malcolm Fraser, Cain Roberts
 
Likes: Futurist
Jan 2017
1,293
Durham
#84
They kinda were. But I think it was only with the competing national interests that led up to WW1 that Germany and France fell into opposing camps. Russia was allied with Serbia due to their shared Slavic and Orthodox Christian heritage. So when Austria (Germany's closest ally) declared war on Serbia, then Russia was obliged to come to Serbia's defense. Germany and the Austro-Hungarian Empire were allied (largely due to a shared Germanic heritage) and thus Germany and Russia became enemies. Up until that time they were allies. France maintained its alliance with Russia and consequently were forced into conflict with Germany who up until the assassination of the Austrian archduke was on friendly terms with the French.
Russia and Serbia, and Germany and Austria, weren't obliged to support one another out of some shared 'heritage'.
 
Likes: Futurist