Why didn't Hitler give the heavily German parts of Transylvania to Hungary in 1940?

Futurist

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Because the aim was to link the areas inhabited by an ethnic Hungarian majority with Hungary through a corridor, nothing more.
Hungary didn't claim the German parts of Transylvania?

Also, the corridor that Hitler gave to Hungary was much larger than it should have been based on purely ethnic criteria:


I was telling you about what the members of the pro-German regime which followed Carol II's pro-British dictatorship thought, I think that the fact that northern Transylvania was returned to Romania due to Romania's change of sides following what you call as "King Michael's Coup" in 1944 was not something expected by them.
Well, my point here was that Romania did ultimately redeem itself, but in a way quite different from what these members were expecting.
 

Tulun

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Banat is an area which historically has been inhabited by many ethnic communities, in various numbers and percents, but with apologies I've never heared about any French speaking or identifying as ethnic French community there. The German community from Banat has been called „șvabi” in Romanian ("Swabians”, Banat Swabians - Wikipedia) , while the German community from "Siebenbürgen" has been called „sași” ("Saxons", Transylvanian Saxons - Wikipedia).
In present day Romania I've heard about Merczyfalva/Mercydorf/Merțișoara/Carani in Temes county which had French speaking settler families in the 18th century and they later assimilated to the Germans. The same was in Újbesenyő/Beșenova Nouă
now Dudeștii Noi. In present day Serbian Banat there were the villages of Szenthubert (Sankt Hubert), Szentborbála (Seultour) és Károlyliget (Charleville) which also hosted French settler families, again later assimilated to the local Germans in the 19th century. These 3 former villages are now all part of Bánátnagyfalu/Banatsko Veliko Selo. There were a few others too maybe.

I'think there were also a few Spanish or Catalan settlers too in the 18th century Banat, but they were wiped out by diseases?
 
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Futurist

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In present day Romania I've heard about Merczyfalva/Mercydorf/Merțișoara/Carani in Temes county which had French speaking settler families in the 18th century and they later assimilated to the Germans. The same was in Újbesenyő/Beșenova Nouă
now Dudeștii Noi. In present day Serbian Banat there were the villages of Szenthubert (Sankt Hubert), Szentborbála (Seultour) és Károlyliget (Charleville) which also hosted French settler families, again later assimilated to the local Germans in the 19th century. These 3 former villages are now all part of Bánátnagyfalu/Banatsko Veliko Selo. There were a few others too maybe.

I'think there were also a few Spanish or Catalan settlers too in the 18th century Banat, but they were wiped out by diseases?
There were also some Slovak and/or Ruthenian/Rusyn settlers in the Banat, no? In 1981, you could still see some Slovaks and Ruthenians in the Yugoslavian Banat:

 

Tulun

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There were also some Slovak and/or Ruthenian/Rusyn settlers in the Banat, no? In 1981, you could still see some Slovaks and Ruthenians in the Yugoslavian Banat:

Yes, but they belonged to the "bigger" settler groups so thats why they still survive, I talked more about the smaller "exotic" settler groups. We could also add catholic Bulgarians (I think some of their descendants live in present day Romanian Banat?). I know about catholic Albanians also settled into present day Vojvodina in the 18th century, but I'm not sure if only to the Srem/Szerémség region (where they assimilated into Croats) or also into the Banat?
 
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deaf tuner

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That's all nice and well, but far more complicated :

In the Banat you had people from Lorraine , both from the French speaking part and the German speaking part. You had Italians , Luxembourger.

And the first did not leave for Germany but for France.

Banat is an area which historically has been inhabited by many ethnic communities, in various numbers and percents, but with apologies I've never heard about any French speaking or identifying as ethnic French community there. The German community from Banat has been called „șvabi” in Romanian ("Swabians”, Banat Swabians - Wikipedia) , while the German community from "Siebenbürgen" has been called „sași” ("Saxons", Transylvanian Saxons - Wikipedia).
Both waves of immigration were heteroclite, settlers weren't coming from the same region. It was more like later emigration to US, for example.

The term of "Saxons" in Hungarian documents suggests a corruption of the word, as it seems it was used to denominate a status rather than an ethnicity (a bit like what happened with the word "Vlach" in Slav area) as its used for miners all over the Hungarian Kingdom (today's Maramures/Romania, today's Slovakia, etc). The term "Schwaben" is also misleading, as only some 10% came actually from Schwaben (Swabia).

Anyway, although sparce, documents do mention Flemish for example, the dialect spoken by the Siebenürgische Sachsen is in the Moselfränkisch group (Romanian President, as from Hermanstadt could Youse his mother tongue to talk with Junker ;) ). The dialect spoken by Donauschwaben (=Banatschwäbisch) is also a mix of previous Franconian dialects.

Indirect sources and clues are pointing to Romance speaking settlers (Walloon, Picard, etc). It's normal that You didn't heard about French speaking/French self-identifying persons/communities, as they came mostly before a true "French identity", plus, they were few and assimilated into the larger Germanic-speaking community.

_____
tulun I wasn't aware of those settlings. I'll try to dig and see if I find something more. Köszönöm !
 
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deaf tuner

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Ficino

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Hungary didn't claim the German parts of Transylvania?
Hungary claimed the whole of Transylvania, but Hitler wanted to give Hungary only what she received through the Second Vienna Award.

Also, the corridor that Hitler gave to Hungary was much larger than it should have been based on purely ethnic criteria:

I don't know how a smaller corridor should have looked, the idea was to link the "Szekely land" with Hungary by a corridor maximizing the number of ethnic Hungarians and minimizing the number of ethnic Romanians as much as possible.

Well, my point here was that Romania did ultimately redeem itself, but in a way quite different from what these members were expecting.
Redeemed herself by what?
 

Futurist

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Hungary claimed the whole of Transylvania, but Hitler wanted to give Hungary only what she received through the Second Vienna Award.
Because he wanted to hope to get Romania as an ally in the future?

I don't know how a smaller corridor should have looked, the idea was to link the "Szekely land" with Hungary including as many ethnic Hungarians and as few ethnic Romanians as convenient to Hungary.
A smaller corridor can look like this:



Please note that this is an alternate history map.

Redeemed herself by what?
By leaving the Axis and joining the Allies, of course. Interestingly enough, I read that this Romanian move actually saved a huge part of Budapest's Jewish population--who were scheduled to begin being deported to Nazi death camps on August 27, 1944 but Romania's switch of sides as a result of King Michael's Coup on August 23, 1944 caused the Nazis to temporarily abandon their plans due to the much more precarious military situation that the Axis found itself in after Romania's defection to the Allies.
 

deaf tuner

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Because he wanted to hope to get Romania as an ally in the future?
You're going (again ?) too far in search of explanations. The Viena treaty simply dissatisfied both Hungary and Romania. Which was arranging all too well Hitler's business.
 
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