Why didn't Japan send some of its own troops to the Western Front during WWI?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,701
SoCal
#1
Why didn't Japan send some of its own troops to the Western Front during World War I? I mean, the US did this even though it was on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean. Thus, why not Japan as well--especially considering that Japan was on the side of the Entente from the very beginning of WWI?
 

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,930
Dispargum
#2
Distance. Japan didn't have the interest or the power projection capability that the US had.

What kind of reward was in it for Japan? They quickly gained control of Germany's Pacific possessions. No one was going to take those away from Japan, possession being 9/10s of the law etc. Woodrow Wilson was willing to fight for idealistic reasons. Japan was not. (There's also that bit about American investment in Allied victory that Japan hadn't made.)
 
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Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,451
Portugal
#3
Distance. Japan didn't have the interest or the power projection capability that the US had.

What kind of reward was in it for Japan? They quickly gained control of Germany's Pacific possessions. No one was going to take those away from Japan, possession being 9/10s of the law etc. Woodrow Wilson was willing to fight for idealistic reasons. Japan was not. (There's also that bit about American investment in Allied victory that Japan hadn't made.)
I think that more than the distance, the second paragraph explains it. Japan didn’t want because it wouldn’t achieve new political or territorial gains.
 

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
26,175
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#5
It's well more easy [and brief] the journey from the Eastern coast of Northern American to Europe than the journey from Japan to Europe. Not to add that the great colonial Empires [the French and the British ones] with their Navies would have done something to impede to the Japanese forces to reach the European battlefields.

The curiosity is that Japanese volunteers were active on the other side [with some advantage about knowledge for Japanese air forces]. Warfare 1914-1918 (Japan) | International Encyclopedia of the First World War (WW1)
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,701
SoCal
#6
Distance. Japan didn't have the interest or the power projection capability that the US had.

What kind of reward was in it for Japan? They quickly gained control of Germany's Pacific possessions. No one was going to take those away from Japan, possession being 9/10s of the law etc. Woodrow Wilson was willing to fight for idealistic reasons. Japan was not. (There's also that bit about American investment in Allied victory that Japan hadn't made.)
Do you think that a less idealistic US President would have been less inclined to send US troops to the Western Front in WWI?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,701
SoCal
#7
It's well more easy [and brief] the journey from the Eastern coast of Northern American to Europe than the journey from Japan to Europe. Not to add that the great colonial Empires [the French and the British ones] with their Navies would have done something to impede to the Japanese forces to reach the European battlefields.

The curiosity is that Japanese volunteers were active on the other side [with some advantage about knowledge for Japanese air forces]. Warfare 1914-1918 (Japan) | International Encyclopedia of the First World War (WW1)
Why would Britain and France block Japanese passage to Europe when Japan is on their side in WWI, though?

Also, wasn't the Panama Canal already completed by this point in time?
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,451
Portugal
#9
Sending troops from the USA to England (where they all went first) is probably shorter and easier than marching Japanese troops over Asia or all the way around Asia’s oceans.
That wouldn’t be a problem if there was will to do so. Portugal, with far less resources sent thousands to men to Mozambique (something between 10000 to 20000 men). It is not exactly near and Mozambique didn't had the logistics capability of France. Many examples could be given, including British ones.