Why didn't large numbers of Serbs settle throughout Yugoslavia like Russians did throughout the USSR?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
17,858
SoCal
#1
Why didn't large numbers of Serbs settle throughout Yugoslavia like Russians did throughout the USSR? In the USSR (and, in some cases, in the Russian Empire before that), Russians settled in various republics in large numbers--probably often in order to help industrialize these republics. This is why, for instance, Kazakhstan, Latvia, and Estonia had huge Russian minorities when they acquired independence in 1991. In contrast, in Yugoslavia, the areas that didn't have much Serb settlement in 1918 didn't have much Serb settlement in 1991 either. Slovenia, Croatia (outside of the Serbian Krajina, that is), and Macedonia never developed large Serb minorities in spite of all of these territories being under Yugoslav rule for seventy years.

Why exactly was this the case?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
17,858
SoCal
#2
Here's a map of Serbs in Yugoslavia in 1981:



As in 1918, in 1981, Serbs were dominant in Serbia, north Kosovo, what is now Republika Srpska, Serbian Krajina, but almost nowhere else.
 
Dec 2017
789
-------
#3
For many reasons in Russia.

Many Russians living other republics are not necessarily ethnic Russians. They are also Ukrainians , Germans, Belarusians, Latvians, Lithuanians, Pontic Greeks, Moldovans, Poles by descent. On some occasions Latvians would use the term Russophone - Russian speakers who merged into Russian speaking community identifying themselves as Russians.
In Russian empire there was Stolypin's agrarian reform when peasants were enticed with cheap land In Kazakhstan and Siberia. Peasants of Latgalian, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Polish descent settled in Kazakhstan. Later many moved further south in Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan. In Russian empire, after Catherine II defeated Crimean Khanata and Crimea with southern and south-eastern Ukraine was transfered to Russian empire 40% of Ukrainians, 40% of Russians 20% of other ethnicities settled the region. Because Russian language was the language of the empire, so Russian prevailed in that region. There was industrialisation during Stalin's era, the republics needed workers and Russians were most numerous, so Russians came to other republics. There were deportations into Kazakhstan and Siberia during Stalin's era

In short, Russians living in republics and Russia itself are not necessarily ethnic Russians by descent. For example the Far East of Russia was settled by large number of Ukrainians.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
17,858
SoCal
#4
Ukrainians are close enough to Russians that this doesn't undercut my main point here, though.

Also, didn't parts of Yugoslavia also need some assistance in becoming industrialized?
 
Dec 2011
4,633
Iowa USA
#5
Ukrainians are close enough to Russians that this doesn't undercut my main point here, though.

Also, didn't parts of Yugoslavia also need some assistance in becoming industrialized?
To the question, the 1918 industrialization of Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes was NOT concentrated in Serbia. I think you appreciate that.
 
Likes: Futurist
Dec 2011
4,633
Iowa USA
#7
Between Vojvodina and Croatia more so probably, someone will be able to say with better understanding than I can.

Perhaps most of the self-identifying Yugoslavs in the 1981 census were in households with a Catholic-Orthodox marriage or a Muslim-Orthodox marriage? Was that percentage approximately 7 or 8 percent of the national population?
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
17,858
SoCal
#8
Between Vojvodina and Croatia more so probably, someone will be able to say with better understanding than I can.
Why not Slovenia?

Perhaps most of the self-identifying Yugoslavs in the 1981 census were in households with a Catholic-Orthodox marriage or a Muslim-Orthodox marriage? Was that percentage approximately 7 or 8 percent of the national population?
Very possible, IMHO.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
17,858
SoCal
#9
You are correct in the sense that the largest Yugoslav presence in 1981 was in Vojvodina, Croatia, and the northernmost part of Bosnia:

 

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
2,691
Republika Srpska
#10
Your question implicitly assumes that the Serbs were the dominant group in Yugoslavia like the Russians were in the USSR. And yes, you can made that argument for the period of the mid to late 1980s, but not before. Especially not during the late 60s and 70s when the Communist leadership of Serbia actually tried to distance Serbia from Yugoslavia.
 
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