Why didn't the ancient Egyptians have a large empire?

okamido

Forum Staff
Jun 2009
29,885
land of Califia
#31
So you are saying that you went there, and identified an impact crater that is not recognized by anyone else...on the planet?
 
Sep 2010
217
Sydney Australia
#32
I don't rely on hearsay. I rely on direct observation.
I think you should report your "discovery" to the scientific community immediately - apparently all the Worlds experts on meteorite impact sites appear to have overlooked your find.

In all seriousness though pointing to a hole in the ground and saying "that’s a impact site” doesn't make it so. Very old or small impact points can be hard to confirm which is why some of the sites on the maps I have seen are marked as disputed or tentative. However as I said earlier no-one I am aware of has reported any evidence of a civilisation threatening meteor impact in Egypt (And it would have to be large one to cause the damage you claim.). I think the closest sites are in Libya and no records I have been able to locate match what you are claiming happened to the ancient Egyptians.

As for radiation I am not an expert but I believe radioactive elements makeup only a minute component, if at all of meteorites (expert opinions sought please!)


Regards:
 
Aug 2009
5,740
Belgium
#35
They only had Egypt, Sudan, and the levant. (I'm not sure if they had Sudan.) That is the peak of their ancient empire.

Now, that is quite surprising to me. A civilisation that is considered to be one of the greatest civilisations in the ancient world. They were crazily advanced in lots of aspects.

But why not the empire?
Lack of interest. The later dynasties of men like Ramses and Thutmosis did have an empire that was comparably larger then those that preceeded it.
 
Dec 2009
19,933
#36
The OP could be asked for any other nation; the vast majority of them all around this Planet and all along History have certainly not been "large empires".

The same as for the other early civilization locations, culture itself didn't necessarily implied a relevant military advantage against non- or poorly civilized neighbors; the latter could perfectly have still been (and indeed often were) proficient warriors.

As previously explained (post # 8), Kemet proper was actually not such a big country from its territorial extension; it was always great from its large population, due to the fertility of the Nile Valley (let say never less than 10% of the total population the Roman Empire).

Even if Kemet may have not been as isolated as suggested by other Historumites, imperialist expansion was indeed considerably restricted.

On one hand, the desert (even the relatively narrow Nubian desert) was a fundamentally impenetrable barrier at least until the introduction of domesticated camelids (not earlier than the Ptolemaic period); that why only a couple of quite closer oases (mainly El-Fayum & Kharga) were regularly occupied by the Pharaohs.

On the other, in spite of the well-attested evidence of sea trade, Egyptians were basically land people; even Cyprus was not occupied until the XXVI dynasty (VI century BC).

As for any other imperial power, their expansion was naturally limited (both to the north and to the south) by the resistance from the local population and cultures; the expansion to the south beyond the first Cataract (Asswan) was additionally restricted by the poor navigability of the Nile.
 
Aug 2009
5,740
Belgium
#37
the expansion to the south beyond the first Cataract (Asswan) was additionally restricted by the poor navigability of the Nile.
Something which is often forgotten and is equally applicable to right about every river up untill the late 19th century (when the I.R. kicked in), namely that they were often poorly navigable.
 
Dec 2009
19,933
#38
Something which is often forgotten and is equally applicable to right about every river up untill the late 19th century (when the I.R. kicked in), namely that they were often poorly navigable.
In fact, the first Cataract of the Nile was effectively the ultimate frontier for the whole Ancient Mediterranean and Classical civilizations, at least up to the Islamic invasions (VII century CE).
 

kbear

Ad Honorem
Sep 2010
6,431
#39
i believe the main reason the egyptian empire didn't expand much was because the pharoahs spent all their money and used all their men to build their temples/cities/pyramids etc... look at akenaten--every chunk of gold he got went to armana--all he cared about was his golden city. if the pharoahs had not been such egomaniacs, they may have had more cash for wars and expanding their borders. and they spent more time worrying about their after-life than the one they were living...:)