Why didn't the Louisiana Territory receive as much settlement as other parts of the US did?

Kotromanic

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
5,008
Iowa USA
What year do you see as the crisis point in regards to this?
To my recollection (not looking at any data before responding) either 1995 or 1996 was the end of a series of wetter summers in the West, so already the length of this dry cycle is notable, at almost 25 years.

There's public data about the depth of the reservoirs along the Colorado river system. Just draw a trend line on the depth of these reservoirs and I do believe that the Colorado is in "zero margin" in less than 15 more years (but I need to have this guesstimate checked...).
 
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Kotromanic

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
5,008
Iowa USA
Too late to edit already in 68 minutes?

Well post #11 needed to read "series of wetter WINTERS in the West".

Has it always been 60 mins or less to edit? Maybe so.
 
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Kotromanic

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
5,008
Iowa USA
With respect, I'd say Nebraska and Kansas get all the rainfall they need. Maybe not as much as some states, but enough to be the nation's breadbasket.
Parts of Nebraska, certainly.

However, the drawdown of the sandstone aquifer beneath Kansas is alarming. A dustbowl in slow-motion. And much appreciation for the salutation! (Are you a Kansan, Sir?)
 
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Aug 2014
67
U.S.
One thing that I find interesting about the US is that while the US's pre-1803 territories and the US's post-1803 territorial acquisitions both received a lot of settlement, the US's territorial acquisition in 1803 in the form of the Louisiana Purchase didn't receive that much settlement over the next 200 years. This can be seen in a map of the number of seats that each US state has in the US House of Representatives nowadays:





The US's pre-1803 territories contain such population heavyweights as New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Illinois and the US's post-1803 territorial acquisitions contain such population heavyweights as Florida, Texas, and California, but among the US states whose territory was a part of the 1803 Louisiana Purchase, none of them even have ten seats in the US House of Representatives nowadays.

Why exactly was the Louisiana Purchase territory much less populated (even nowadays) in comparison to both the US's pre-1803 territories and the US's post-1803 territorial acquisitions? Any thoughts on this?
It's not just the US. About 40% of the people on the planet live within 60 miles of salt water.

Transportation and Communications have always been central factors in human history, and oceans make transportation easy.
 
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Aug 2014
67
U.S.
It's not just the US. About 40% of the people on the planet live within 60 miles of salt water.

Transportation and Communications have always been central factors in human history, and oceans make transportation easy.
Just thought of something to add. The state of Washington, where I live, is about 400 miles from east to west, but so many of the people live in the Puget Sound area that a local politician running for state governor was once told "You can see all the voters you need from the top of the Space Needle." (For those who don't know, the Space Needle is a 500 foot high tourist attraction in downtown Seattle.)
 
Sep 2012
1,140
Tarkington, Texas
People are moving out of California to nearby states, Arizona, Nevada and Oregon. Climate has affected some of the states. Louisiana had a flood in New Orleans and the people can't afford to move back. Missouri has lost jobs and the people are leaving. My Mother's parents moved to Louisiana from Arkansas (Arkies!). A guy I know was from Arkansas and he moved to Little Rock after college. He came back to SW Louisiana. People who can't find work in Louisiana often move to Texas. These days people follow the jobs a lot. How else do Samoans relocate to Dallas Metro from Southern California?

When I was younger Louisiana had 8 Congressmen. Texas and California have really added a bunch since then.

Pruitt