Why didn't the US invade Cuba?

May 2016
71
UK
Fidel Castro remained a major thorn in the side of the US during his tenure as president of Cuba, so much so that the CIA devoted considerable time and resources devising ingenious methods of killing or discrediting him. From exploding cigars to staged terrorist attacks, Castro survived them all, including the Bay of Pigs invasion by Cuban nationals.

It begs the question. Why didn't the US just send in the troops?
 
Feb 2013
1,283
Second City
Fidel Castro remained a major thorn in the side of the US during his tenure as president of Cuba, so much so that the CIA devoted considerable time and resources devising ingenious methods of killing or discrediting him. From exploding cigars to staged terrorist attacks, Castro survived them all, including the Bay of Pigs invasion by Cuban nationals.
An "ingenious method" would have killed him. Toxic fungus in a wetsuit and exploding cigars and poison coffee is Marx Brothers meets bungling mafiosi.

It begs the question. Why didn't the U.S. just send in the troops?
To begin with, the United States had no cassus belli against Cuba whatsoever. And President Kennedy did send in troops that had been armed and trained and supplied in the United States by the Eisenhower and Kennedy administrations. The fruit of this effort is known to posterity as the Bay of Pigs.

After the October Missile Crisis of 1962, the US and Soviets sought to deescalate tensions, one means of which was a public agreement on the part of the United States not to invade Cuba.
 
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May 2016
71
UK
To begin with, the United States had no cassus belli against Cuba whatsoever.
But they did. Castro overthrew the US-backed government.

And President Kennedy did send in troops that had been armed and trained in the United States. The fruit of this effort is known to posterity as the Bay of Pigs.
I mentioned that.

After the October Missile Crisis of 1962, the US and Soviets sought to deescalate tensions, one means of which was a public agreement on the part of the United States not to invade Cuba.
They had three years to get rid of him beforehand. Seems strange they didn't act when a crisis presented itself on their doorstep, given their action in Korea and Vietnam.
 
Feb 2013
1,283
Second City
But they did. Castro overthrew the US-backed government.
A tame dictator being overthrown is nothing like a legal cassus belli. That was the whole reason for Bay of Pigs in the first place: to make it look (however unconvincingly) like Cuban exiles were retaking their homeland, not spearheading yet another US invasion of the island.

And the US did practically nothing to help Batista, even when the 26th of July Movement was driving on Havana. In fact, the US suspended arms shipments to the Batista regime in March of 1958 and had seriously pressured Batista to step down. The reason for this policy was that Batista's brutal, ramshackle, Mafia-bought-and-paid-for dictatorship was distasteful to practically anybody who hadn't been treated to a gambling junket at the Hotel Nacional. Too, the Eisenhower administration knew that Batista was unpopular enough to hedge its bets by supplying Raúl Castro's "Second Front" with over $50,000 and (very likely) arms during their struggle against Batista's autocracy.

I mentioned that.
Yes, which is why I mentioned it. You answer your own question—why didn't the Kennedy administration send troops to invade Cuba? Well, as you said, the Kennedy administration tried and the Kennedy administration failed.

They had three years to get rid of him beforehand. Seems strange they didn't act when a crisis presented itself on their doorstep, given their action in Korea and Vietnam.
Well the White House was tacitly backing the Cuban Revolution for a time after Batista's ouster, and serious anti-Castro planning by the US government only began in March of 1960.
 
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Jan 2015
1,309
meo
A tame dictator being overthrown is nothing like a legal cassus belli.
Oh come on! It's America. That reason is a good enough CB for America. I have seen America attacking countries for reason more trivial than that. But again, America is also known for having a habit of abandoning their puppet dictators left and right. It's 1960, there's no need to make things even more tense then it's. The Bay of Pigs invasion and the missile crisis proved that America didnt have the balls to go all out.
 

Wenge

Ad Honoris
Apr 2011
10,429
Virginia
Oh come on! It's America. That reason is a good enough CB for America. I have seen America attacking countries for reason more trivial than that. But again, America is also known for having a habit of abandoning their puppet dictators left and right. It's 1960, there's no need to make things even more tense then it's. The Bay of Pigs invasion and the missile crisis proved that America didnt have the balls to go all out.
The United States invading Cuba would have started WWIII. Balls have nothing to do with it.

Name the puppet dictators we have abandoned left and right.
 
Dec 2008
764
Vancouver-by-the-Sea
Batista's brutal, ramshackle, Mafia-bought-and-paid-for dictatorship was distasteful to practically anybody who hadn't been treated to a gambling junket at the Hotel Nacional.
hehehehehehehehehe