Why didn't Tsarist Russia support Mongolian independence following the Xinhai Revolution?

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,427
Republika Srpska
#6
Russian Empire and Mongolia did sign an agreement in 1912. The agreement stipulated that Mongolia's territorial integrity must be respected and also gave Russia privileges in Mongolia. There were also plans to create a Mongolian army with Russian help. Russia officially recognized Mongolia as an autonomous part of China, but the man who signed the 1912 agreement, Ivan Yakovlevich Korostovets, went on to say that signing the agreement was pretty much recognizing Mongolian independence. The agreement caused an uproar among Chinese nationalists and almost lead to conflict. In fact, Mongolia remained de facto independent from China for quite a while and it was mostly due to Russian protection. So they pretty much recognized Mongolia, though not officially.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,200
SoCal
#7
Russian Empire and Mongolia did sign an agreement in 1912. The agreement stipulated that Mongolia's territorial integrity must be respected and also gave Russia privileges in Mongolia. There were also plans to create a Mongolian army with Russian help. Russia officially recognized Mongolia as an autonomous part of China, but the man who signed the 1912 agreement, Ivan Yakovlevich Korostovets, went on to say that signing the agreement was pretty much recognizing Mongolian independence. The agreement caused an uproar among Chinese nationalists and almost lead to conflict. In fact, Mongolia remained de facto independent from China for quite a while and it was mostly due to Russian protection. So they pretty much recognized Mongolia, though not officially.
That's the thing, though--not recognizing Mongolia's independence officially would have meant that China would have still had a legitimate claim to it--which in turn could have paved the way for a future Chinese reconquest of Mongolia.

If Russia actually wanted to make Mongolian independence stick, then it should have literally and actually forced China to recognize Mongolian independence (in a de jure sense as well as in a de facto sense). That's what Stalin did for Chiang in 1945 and for Mao in 1949-1950.
 
Apr 2017
1,559
U.S.A.
#9
It would be kind of hard when Xinjiang is in the way, though.
Their not going to form some giant central Asian state, they would all have their own states.
That they have different religions and that they don't neighbor each other is irrelevant.
After ww2 most of Europe's colonies pressed for independence, including Christian and muslim ones. The fact that one got there before the other didn't matter.
Of note Britain advised Russia to abolish Mongolian independence because it was concerned that "if Mongolians gain independence then Central Asians will revolt".
The position of Russia was to reduce Mongolian independence to an autonomy limited to Outer Mongolia only. Negotiations continued for eight months (in 1915) as the Mongolian representatives firmly defended the independence of the country, but finally the government of Mongolia had to accept Russia's position.
 
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