Why didn't Vichy France restore the French monarchy?

Dec 2011
1,369
Belgium
Thanks again, Isleifson, for your immediate reply.
I had a look to Heimdal of your link and while the subjects were so "special" now I understand. Also when I had a look about Jean Mabire...

You seems to know a lot about France, you, from la Lorraine tudesque or have I have to say, we, from the Romance-Germanic borderland :)...

Kind regards, Paul.
 

Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
5,930
Didn't Finland and Denmark both receive some Jewish immigrants and refugees in the early 20th century, though?
The Finnish Jews appeared first in the 19th c. and came from Russia. Initially it was soldiers in the imperial army stationed in Finland that were temporarily permitted to remain in Finland. The Finnish constitution, lifted directly over from the Swedish period, did not technically allow Jews to settle in Finland, but dispensations were given. Still the Jews in Finland had no civil rights and very limited options for how to make a living, mostly they sold used clothes. The Liberals in parliament started petitioning for civil right for the Jews in the 1870's, but it wasn't until independence in 1918 that they got it. The group wasn't very large. By 1880 there were 1000 Jews living in Finland. That number seems to have remained relatively consistent until independence, and the in the interwar period the group actually doubled to approx 2000 through immigration from the Soviet Union.

There have been Jews in Denmark since the 17th c. Originally it was Portugese Jews, an extension of the large Jewish community in Amsterdam. Later in the 18th c. they were augmented by German Jewish families immigrating to Denmark. The Danish Jews were given full citizen's rights same as any Dane with the promulgation of the constitution of 1849. The Danish Jews were about 4000 in the 19th c. Then there was a considerable influx of East European Jews passing through Denmark, some 10000, in the period 1904-16. Of these something between 2500 and 4000 are estimated to actually have settled in Denmark. The end result was a rise in numbers Danish Jewish to an all-time-high of 8000. Come 1930's Denmark shut its borders to Jewish refugees fleeing Nazi persecution, same as a lot of countries in similar situations. By 1943, when the Jewish community was spirited to Sweden the numbers had dropped to 6400, the remainder slightly unclear by shared between one group unwillingly expelled to unknown fates for not being Danish citizens, and another having more willingly set off to elsewhere to try to make a new life (US and Israel for the most part). The Danish Jews were for the most part safely transferred to Sweden. 470 were however captured and sent to Theresienstadt. Over an 18 month period 51 of these expired, before the Swedish Red Cross managed to negotiate itself into the German KZ camps, and could extricate the surviving 419. So the total Danish Jewish community death toll in WWII ended at 51.
 
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Isleifson

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,122
Lorraine tudesque
I had a look to Heimdal of your link and while the subjects were so "special" now I understand. Also when I had a look about Jean Mabire...

You seems to know a lot about France, you, from la Lorraine tudesque or have I have to say, we, from the Romance-Germanic borderland :)...

Kind regards, Paul.
Dear Paul,

As it happens a had an aunt who did marry an gentleman from Normandy who was involved in this Nordic Normandy thing.

We never thought much about him , we used to think that he married my aunt only because she owned an old castle.

On day a journalist from Iceland showed up and he wanted to speak with our Norman. And much to my astonishment he was able to speak Icelandic with the journalist .


They are both long gone by now, but I still have some books from the Norman.

The books and magazines from Heimdal are very interesting for every body interested in the history of France in WW2.

Amitiés Isleif
 

Isleifson

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,122
Lorraine tudesque
Not far away from my village there was an old hotel used by an zionist organisation called the Vanguard.


Most of the German jews in France were penniless and young as often the jewish family just managed to send the children from Germany to France.
This people had an harsh life in France and plenty of problems with the police.

So when this Zionist organisation offered them free housing , they accepted even if most most of them were not intersted to be trained to be a settler in Palestine.

So the student from Frankfurt who wanted to study laws was trained as a farmer and the girl from Köln who wanted to became a nurse learned to be a gardener.

Several hundreds passed trough this school and were send to Palestine.

They all survived the war as the school closed in 1939.
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
5,390
Sydney
For a french, being German would be regarded with some suspicion
it certainly would evoke recent bad memories , every village and town had monument full of list of the dead ,
many family were still grieving their losses , amputated and disabled ex-soldiers were present in their ten of thousands
Germans of Jewish identity had been enthusiastic proponents of the war against France
notably Fritz Haber , the greatest chemist of his time , who lobbied successfully for the use of poison gas

karma is a bitch , his laboratory solved the problem of the packaging and delivery of Zirklon B
 
Dec 2011
1,369
Belgium
Not far away from my village there was an old hotel used by an zionist organisation called the Vanguard.


Most of the German jews in France were penniless and young as often the jewish family just managed to send the children from Germany to France.
This people had an harsh life in France and plenty of problems with the police.

So when this Zionist organisation offered them free housing , they accepted even if most most of them were not intersted to be trained to be a settler in Palestine.

So the student from Frankfurt who wanted to study laws was trained as a farmer and the girl from Köln who wanted to became a nurse learned to be a gardener.

Several hundreds passed trough this school and were send to Palestine.

They all survived the war as the school closed in 1939.
I am nearly sure, Isleifson, that I saw that hotel/school in a documentary about the Jews in France (from the French/German channel ARTE). It was real footage in black-white.
And thank you also very much for the family history about Heimdal.

Kind regards, Paul.