Why do people miss the USSR and a lot even want it back?

tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
13,323
#11
Was that really the case? Do elaborate in light of the fact that the concept of opportunity doesn't mean much in a closed communist country.


Maybe not in Donald Trump - Louisiana swamp poacher or Mukesh Ambani - starving South Indian farmer sense but very much there. In communist countries (the ones that follow communist economy) riches come with power and position in government. Central committee and politburo members all had private dachas in Moscow suburbs while the urban population lived in the pigeonholes of government apartments.
Stalin was Georgian... Khrutshev and Brezhnev ukrainian.... Chevarnadze georgian..... Mikoyan (MiG planes) armenian..... and so on.... Opportunity has meaning in any society..... its about having the possibility to achieve high positions in that society

As a rather graphich example, Baku (the capital of Azerbaidjan) was a multicultural city..... after the fall of the USSR the azeris ethnically cleansed the armenians..... And this is by no means the only example of post USSR ethnic conflict

The fact that a few privileged had access to benefits (which btw were relatively modest and mostly invisible to the rest of population) does not change the fact that compared to today, the rich/poor divide was de facto non existent...
 
Sep 2012
3,779
Bulgaria
#12
Khrushchev was born in what is today RF near the present Ukrainian border / ethnically he was Russian.

Brezhnev was indeed born in what is today Ukraine, but i am not sure about his ethnicity.

Anastas Mikoyan was a Soviet statesman from the days of Lenin's rule till the end of Brezhnev's rule, the only politician who managed to remain near the top with pretty much amount of power in his hands for half a century.

Artem Mikoyan from Mikoyan-Gurevich / MiG was aircraft designer and the younger brother of Anastas .
 
Last edited:
Apr 2018
587
India
#14
Stalin was Georgian... Khrutshev and Brezhnev ukrainian.... Chevarnadze georgian..... Mikoyan (MiG planes) armenian..... and so on.... Opportunity has meaning in any society..... its about having the possibility to achieve high positions in that society

As a rather graphich example, Baku (the capital of Azerbaidjan) was a multicultural city..... after the fall of the USSR the azeris ethnically cleansed the armenians..... And this is by no means the only example of post USSR ethnic conflict

The fact that a few privileged had access to benefits (which btw were relatively modest and mostly invisible to the rest of population) does not change the fact that compared to today, the rich/poor divide was de facto non existent...
Thing is, it's a very complex question without a straight answer. Among the revolution's old breed, ethnicity meant nothing. Heck, Dzerzhinsky was Polish. But during Stalin's rule, being part of certain ethnic groups at certain times and places meant doom for people. Like Holodomor for Ukrainians, forced exile of Chechens, Ingushis, Kabardilos, Crimean Tatars etc. Although not openly antisemitic but there have been sporadic instances of antisemitism throughout the history of Soviet Union. And there was always a hegemony of Europeans over Asians. Probably it was partially because of the remoteness and underdeveloped state of Asian USSR but such discrimination weren't uncommon.

However, it is undeniable that Soviet Union was far better than what most of the post Soviet Republics have become. And biggest irony is that it was/is the former Soviets themselves who turned their respective homelands into whatever they are now. Especially true for Belarus and the Asiatic Republics.

Armenia is the extreme example of the tragedy of post Soviet states. Azeri-Armenian conflict was something that was kept in check by the Soviets. Also the presence of the Soviets means less interference from the self styled Gods of liberal Islam down south. Once that were gone, Armenians were finished.

Sigh, it gives me creeps to think about those poor fellas at Metsamor.
 

Solidaire

Ad Honorem
Aug 2009
5,451
Athens, Greece
#16
I think the reason is because Communism was not succeeded by a balanced, well regulated model of Capitalism, but by the wild variety, with massive inequality, widespread poverty with no social state to soften the edges, and corruption. For many, this resulted in a life much worse than the one under Communism. They were poor and unfree then, but healthcare, education, employment, a roof over their head, all the basic material needs were guaranteed by the state, in contrast to what followed afterwards.

I've met several immigrants from ex-Communist countries, when I asked an elder Ukrainian lady to compare then and now, she told me that what she missed the most from Communism was the lack of stress; if someone refrained from stepping on the regime's toes, life was quiet and without much to lose sleep over.
 
Feb 2019
602
Serbia
#18
In Serbia, and in most of the Balkans there is a degree of nostalgia for Yugoslavia. I would imagine the reasons are similar for the USSR.

The state went down in chaos and instability and its successors were considerably poorer and with less influence, so the old state is remembered as a form of a society that was better and stronger. Then there is the case of older people remembering it, but they might remember the times when they were young and at the prime of their lives without noticing the differences in politics and the way of life. Some might genuinely miss it and feel sad because it's gone. It varies from person to person but I find these to be the most common reasons.
 
Likes: macon

Solidaire

Ad Honorem
Aug 2009
5,451
Athens, Greece
#20
Would you prefer a Stalin or a Macron, though? Let us be honest here.
Me? But my preferences are off topic anyway, I have never lived under Communism. But to reply regardless, there's no question about it, I value my freedom too much to choose Stalin or any totalitarian regime anyway, and in any case, Macron is not exactly the perfect candidate as an advocate of "wild capitalism". He is a neoliberal, but not of the Chilean, Chicago Boys variety. Besides, it's not just about a deregulated economy; corruption, nepotism and favouritism are unrelated to economic models, they are malaises that can be observed regardless, augmenting the bad sides of any model.
 

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