Why do people miss the USSR and a lot even want it back?

#52
The problem with communism is, it gets real nasty if the system gets polluted beyond a degree. By that I mean corruption. Then it becomes a prison. This problem is less prevalent in pioneering countries as there is an urge towards development (in all senses) but in 'follower' countries. In such cases you get fanatics and opportunists blabbering about Marx and Lenin at the slightest opportunity but beyond that there is absolutely nothing but a defunct system with a worthless government.

I have lived the first 16 years of my life under one of the world's most inept and worthless communist governments, Communist Party of India (Marxist), known simply as CPM. These pieces of work ruled the state of West Bengal for about 28 years, destroyed the industry, so completely destroyed the understanding of democratic functionality in the society that even about 10 years after their ouster we need 492 companies of Central Armed Police Forces of India to ensure elections happen peacefully and sc****d the education system so bad that anyone coming from a State Board School can never compete properly at national level despite having good knowledge because the focus on applicability is zero. In their wake they left a borderline fascist government run by goons who are struggling to remain in power.

My eldest uncle was a nuclear scientist and he made regular visits to Soviet Union. He was lucky because when he had been a student before commies came to power. But later he moved to Bombay as a scientist of BARC and therefore never had to experience daily life under these idiots. However whenever he came home he often said that compared to Russia, the people who you let rule yourselves are circus clowns.

I have read school textbooks and Russian books translated into English by Mir Publishers. I still read Soviet era engineering books, they used to come for almost no price at all and are still damn good for revising fundamentals. But I'm more than glad that those idiots I mentioned above are gone. At least I don't have to hear some stupid joker shouting in a microphone - "There is a bomb called Napalm. Which spreads fire upon exploding. In Vietnam, America dropped millions of tonnes of this. Now going back to schedule, our next speaker will now deliver his speech on............................."

I'm a Russophile (not a blind one though) and am grateful to the Soviets for many things. However I hate commies. I wouldn't mind if that damn congregation of luddites and red painted worthless fascists cease to become a thing tomorrow, along with their platitude.

Maybe this was somewhat off topic but thought I should share my experience with communism.
 
Mar 2019
850
Kansas
#53
The problem with communism is, it gets real nasty if the system gets polluted beyond a degree. By that I mean corruption. Then it becomes a prison. This problem is less prevalent in pioneering countries as there is an urge towards development (in all senses) but in 'follower' countries. In such cases you get fanatics and opportunists blabbering about Marx and Lenin at the slightest opportunity but beyond that there is absolutely nothing but a defunct system with a worthless government.
It was really the big mistake that all the great communist and socialist thinkers made. Forgetting to factor in human nature. We really don't know if the system works, because no one has managed to implement it the way the theory suggests it should. And I don't think we ever will.
 
#54
It was really the big mistake that all the great communist and socialist thinkers made. Forgetting to factor in human nature. We really don't know if the system works, because no one has managed to implement it the way the theory suggests it should. And I don't think we ever will.
Further aggravated by attempts to impose the system on people like a religion. There are still pro-Mao elements that think if you read the Redbook then there is nothing else left to read in the world.

Nobel laureate Bengali poet Rabindranath Tagore wrote in his travalogue after a trip to the USSR back in the 30s- "This socio-economic system is like a (inflexible) cast piece, it won't last long." Little did he know what fate awaited his own land.
 
Jan 2017
4,331
Sydney
#55
I've lived in the USSR for two years
it was horrible
Free transport , free education , free housing ,free heating , free medical care
actually not really free you had to pay like 10 cents for all of the above
summer holiday camps for the kids , women working at all levels, job security
no crime
it was really boring , the news were fake news and each flat was issued with one free radio with one station only
the local complained about the lack of vodka and good music

thanks God this came to an end
then there were beggars in the streets , thieves in government and murderers breaking through the windows
just like in a normal country
 
Jan 2019
42
Eastern Europe
#56
It was really the big mistake that all the great communist and socialist thinkers made. Forgetting to factor in human nature. We really don't know if the system works, because no one has managed to implement it the way the theory suggests it should. And I don't think we ever will.
Agree, human nature (for now and the next hundreds or thousands years) will prevent communism from happen unless it is everywhere or in some closed societies. It relies on equality but humans by default are not equal and always want something that other person doesn't have. Unless they are forced to cope with it by the government. I recall somebody saying - "if everything was free here, I would take as many things as possible and sell them in another country".

I've lived in the USSR for two years
it was horrible
Free transport , free education , free housing ,free heating , free medical care
actually not really free you had to pay like 10 cents for all of the above
summer holiday camps for the kids , women working at all levels, job security
no crime
it was really boring , the news were fake news and each flat was issued with one free radio with one station only
the local complained about the lack of vodka and good music

thanks God this came to an end
then there were beggars in the streets , thieves in government and murderers breaking through the windows
just like in a normal country
/s

Well, honestly nothing can be free. In theory - yes, in reality - no.
 
Sep 2012
3,687
#57
USSR had a lot of good points - for example free education and childcare, free medicine, free activities. Actually a lot of social policies came due to commies and capitalists being afraid of the middle class (now we are moving from that - not everywhere - but in general). Food was of a good quality due to enforced standards by the government. You could travel cheaply. Due to urbanization people from villages came to cities and thus people were more close to each other due to village mentality. You could ask any neighbor for help (while now it would look odd) or even leave the keys from you apartment to them. After university you could easily get a job and it was actually enforced to work for a couple of years so you are good anyway.
Pretty much all the positive aspects were achieved outside of the USSR as well - especially in social democratic systems. So those were not really something USSR exclusive. And they were achieved without repression or full state control over economy or planned economy.
 
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#58
I've lived in the USSR for two years
it was horrible
Free transport , free education , free housing ,free heating , free medical care
actually not really free you had to pay like 10 cents for all of the above
summer holiday camps for the kids , women working at all levels, job security
no crime
it was really boring , the news were fake news and each flat was issued with one free radio with one station only
the local complained about the lack of vodka and good music

thanks God this came to an end
then there were beggars in the streets , thieves in government and murderers breaking through the windows
just like in a normal country
And why did that happen? I mean Russia could absorb the shock and move on (In a way) but look what happened to the other republics.
 
Jan 2017
1,194
Durham
#59
Sure, that's all you hear in American media. Logical, since USSR was the arch enemy of the U.S...
I think some of this you have right but wide of the mark in other areas.

You would have to argue the case with established historians who have documented, presumably from source materials, Stalin and associates' kidnapping of tens of thousands of people to build railways hundreds of miles away. Communism is tyranny. That shouldn't really be open to debate. Surely the definition of tyranny is censorship and coercion and that is abundant in communist states.

I'm not so sure about hunger though, because the people I spoke with in Belgrade and Sarajevo felt they were better provided for when in the old Yugoslavia.

And, in terms of mass slaughter, I think Western nations would rank very high in the list of being involved in wars and killing lots of people.

All in all, I don't think there's any room for advocating a communist society because it's a flawed concept that leads to tyranny, but at the same time, while I think democracy is a much better bet than communism, it's not without it's flaws, it's not as good a system as a lot of people believe in the West, and it's only an idea that in a few hundred years will have been surpassed by some other idea.
 
Jan 2019
42
Eastern Europe
#60
All in all, I don't think there's any room for advocating a communist society because it's a flawed concept that leads to tyranny, but at the same time, while I think democracy is a much better bet than communism, it's not without it's flaws, it's not as good a system as a lot of people believe in the West, and it's only an idea that in a few hundred years will have been surpassed by some other idea.
Communism is actually quite a young idea. Is it even 300 years old? Democracy is as ancient as humans themselves. Only probably tyranny is older, much older even.
 
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