Why do people miss the USSR and a lot even want it back?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,060
SoCal
#62
At least (depending on your ideology) you knew who the bad guys were.
Bush, in his own words

"When I was coming up, it was a dangerous world, and you knew exactly who they were. It was us vs them, and it was clear who them was. Today, we are not so sure who the they are, but we know they're there." Iowa Western Community College, January 21 2000
 
Likes: MG1962a

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,060
SoCal
#63
Mere existence of Soviet Union kept Americans at check from doing whatever they wish. Soviet Union was good for those living outside it.
It might have been good for certain peoples and much less so for other peoples. For instance, Algerians and Bengalis might have benefited from the Soviet Union. Poles, Czechs, Slovaks, Hungarians, Romanians, Bulgarians, Ethiopians, Eritreans, and Angolans? Not so much.
 
Likes: andyferdinard

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,060
SoCal
#64
Here in Italy some people have nostalgia for the era when Soviet Union was a worldpower because.....they're Communist (I won't deny it's a small percentage of the population though). For some Communists Soviet Union was a myth, a legendary nation who had fough against Nazi barbarians and who was fighting against imperialism/ capitalism.
I'd like too to know why some former Soviet citizens prefer today's to the '70 and '80 in Soviet Union (because today it's oligarch's rule? high crime-rate?)...or the contrary (because economy wasn't good as in the West under Brezhnev or Andropov?).
Oligarchs ruled in the 1990s. Not so much in the 1970s and 1980s. That's when the party bosses ruled.
 

Ficino

Ad Honorem
Apr 2012
6,941
Romania
#65
It was really the big mistake that all the great communist and socialist thinkers made. Forgetting to factor in human nature. We really don't know if the system works, because no one has managed to implement it the way the theory suggests it should. And I don't think we ever will.
How the theory suggest that it should be implemented?
 

Ficino

Ad Honorem
Apr 2012
6,941
Romania
#66
Free medicine indeed. Anticommunism was considered a mental disorder and people were locked up in hospitals.
Not anticommunism as such, but people who manifestly opposed the regime were indeed considered insane and interned in mental hospitals, because the idea was that no one in his full mind would dare to do a thing like that.
 
Mar 2019
1,635
Kansas
#67
How the theory suggest that it should be implemented?
Marx suggested that the system would create leaders. What has generally happened is individuals gamed the system. They have used it to advance their agenda to consolidating power to suit their egos rather than for the advancement of the society they are trying to lead.
 

Ficino

Ad Honorem
Apr 2012
6,941
Romania
#68
Marx suggested that the system would create leaders. What has generally happened is individuals gamed the system. They have used it to advance their agenda to consolidating power to suit their egos rather than for the advancement of the society they are trying to lead.
Where did Marx suggest that the system would create "leaders"? Anyway, according to him the "new" man is the result of the system and not vice versa. He prophesied a development according to which not only that what those who have reached the respective consciousness and lead the movement preach and do coincides with the interest of the many (who will rally to their cause) and of the humanity as a whole, but that the victory of the cause would be the implacable result of historical determinations. He didn't write any manual of ascetic practice that would move away human beings from worldly passions and egotism, he wasn't interested in things like that.
 
Last edited:
Jun 2019
61
St.Petersburg
#69
Okay, so why do some people miss Stalin?
Stalin's terror touched a lot of people, including high level leaders. But there is an opposite side: a lot of people made overwhelming careers, got vacant apartments.
These "beneficiaries" often had no any chance to win fair career competition. Of course, some of them fell down as fast as climbed up.
But anyway percentage of survivors inside this group was much higher, than among repressed people.
And, of course, their children got quite specific point of view to the Stalin's methods.
 
Likes: andyferdinard
Jun 2019
35
USA
#70
Not anticommunism as such, but people who manifestly opposed the regime were indeed considered insane and interned in mental hospitals, because the idea was that no one in his full mind would dare to do a thing like that.
Good old Sluggish Schizophrenia. Only found in the USSR and Warsaw Pact countries.
 

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