Why Does Poland Have No Medieval History?

Aug 2018
19
Mexico
#1
Like ever looked up books on medieval Poland? They're some of the most non-existent books ever. You can find plenty of information on Hitler's invasion of Poland, but that's about it, which I find very disappointing. :deadhorse: What is the history of medieval Poland, and how does one go about learning such an exclusive subject?
 
Aug 2017
74
USA
#2
For a decent chunk of late medieval/early renaissance they were merged with Lithuania and some other territories, and went under the name "Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth". Perhaps you'll have more luck searching for that term. The reason there is so little is twofold. First, the Soviets destroyed a lot of knowledge. Second, there seems to be a lack of interest in the west, so not much is translated.
 
Aug 2018
19
Mexico
#3
For a decent chunk of late medieval/early renaissance they were merged with Lithuania and some other territories, and went under the name "Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth". Perhaps you'll have more luck searching for that term. The reason there is so little is twofold. First, the Soviets destroyed a lot of knowledge. Second, there seems to be a lack of interest in the west, so not much is translated.
Thanks, man. That is interesting with Russia. I read they were some of the fiercest enemies (down to fighting over who made the vodka first, lol). I had a feeling they'd have more in the Polish, but I don't want to learn the language to get to it, haha. Takes so much time, and even then it still difficult.

I will try your suggestion on Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,095
SoCal
#4
You can try going on Wikipedia and reading about the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth there. Basically, you could take a look at the sources that are cited in Wikipedia and then see if you can find and read these sources in their entirety.
 
Mar 2017
870
Colorado
#6
"With the Battle of Lubiszew in 1577, the 'Golden Age' of the Husaria began. Between then and the Battle of Vienna in 1683, the Hussars fought many battles against various enemies, most of which they won. In the battles of Lubiszew in 1577, Byczyna (1588), Kokenhausen (1601), Kircholm (1605), Kłuszyn (1610), Chocim (1621), Martynów (1624), Trzciana (1629), Ochmatów (1644), Beresteczko (1651), Połonka (1660), Cudnów (1660), Chocim (1673), Lwów (1675), Vienna (1683), and Párkány (1683), they proved to be the decisive factor against often overwhelming odds. For instance, in the Battle of Kluszyn during the Polish–Muscovite War, the Russians outnumbered the Commonwealth army 5 to 1, yet were heavily defeated."




https://youtu.be/_H0Bds79f4U

They got the horses wrong. My father was a cavalry officer in WW II and rode a "Polish Arabian." They bred Arabian horses with draft horses, and got something almost draft horse size that could jump fences and ditches ... if the rider fell off, the horse would would lower its reins over the man and wait.

I haven't read this, so maybe it was cavalry myth. The wings were supposed to not only spook opposing horses that had never seen that silhouette before, but they also made a noise as the wind blew through them. Only the most heavy duty boys wore the winged armor.

At their height, they were the world's best heavy cavalry.
 
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Corvidius

Ad Honorem
Jul 2017
2,917
Crows nest
#7
For anybody wanting to know the History of Poland, then I recommend reading God's Playground by Norman Davies and in two volumes. I recommend his other books about Poland as well.

While Davies does cover the pre history in his first volume, for a more exhaustive work that gives context to who the various Slav peoples are in relation to each other, then I recommend The Early Slavs by P.M. Barford
 
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Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,113
US
#9
In addition to Davies' volumes, which are excellent, here are a few more suggestions,

Poland, and The Polish Way: A Thousand-Year History of the Poles and Their Culture, both by Adam Zamoyski.