Why has Continental Europe put themselves back regarding Science compared to Anglo-Saxon world?

Jun 2017
2,555
Connecticut
#31
110 years ago, most advances in Physics, Chemistry, Bio-Chemistry, were distributed among Germany (they were at the top), France, Denmark, Great Britain, United States, Netherlands.

But nowadays, among the top 30 best universities in the world, only Zürich ETH appears as non-anglosaxon university, while almost every university is American or British. Its hard to see German Nobel laureates in science, in the past 2 decades, but american, british, canadian are extremely common, even Japanese.

It seems continental Europe is not top in Natural Science anymore. (Well, there is the CERN, but still, most of their guys are British)
We Americans are part of the "Anglo-Saxon World"?

Federalism maybe provides for more universities, each state has a flagship uni the funding of which will be the top high education priority of that given state government, the rising cost of college also makes said school the best affordable option to all the people in that given state. In state tuition in essence creates fifty separate public education markets in the US with the people who could afford out of state tuition largely opting for private school. Another one of the few positives of the American student debt crisis and the increased costs of college is it's also given hundreds maybe thousands of colleges incredibly deep pockets not even counting endowment. America also is undergoing the STEM craze where there's this notion that STEM are the only worthwhile fields because to some college=job school so there's been a huge funneling of resources to said programs at the expense of everything else on a fairly bi partisan basis.
 
Last edited:

Willempie

Ad Honorem
Jul 2015
4,735
Netherlands
#34
We Americans are part of the "Anglo-Saxon World"?

Federalism maybe provides for more universities, each state has a flagship uni the funding of which will be the top high education priority of that given state government, the rising cost of college also makes said school the best affordable option to all the people in that given state. In state tuition in essence creates fifty separate public education markets in the US with the people who could afford out of state tuition largely opting for private school. Another one of the few positives of the American student debt crisis and the increased costs of college is it's also given hundreds maybe thousands of colleges incredibly deep pockets not even counting endowment. America also is undergoing the STEM craze where there's this notion that STEM are the only worthwhile fields because to some college=job school so there's been a huge funneling of resources to said programs at the expense of everything else on a fairly bi partisan basis.
Better STEM, than what we have here. Where the social "sciences" (in particular the grievance studies) are getting way too much money when compared with the STEM or crafts (ie electricians).
I stop now, because otherwise I will go on a rant about the universities and the social sciences in particular.
 

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