Why haven't countries like Ethiopia and Sudan changed their names?

Jun 2013
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canada
"Doing just fine" implies something a bit unrealistic. Africans are no worse and no better than any other peoples. Capable of fine deed and the worst imaginable atrocities -- all of us. Personal exceptions, but no national exceptions.
You seem to have omitted the rest of the sentence: surviving just fine growing crops and herding livestock. i.e. they had enough to eat.

Nitpicking much?
 

Zeno

Ad Honoris
Jan 2010
13,691
♪♬ ♫♪♩
Ok, ignorance on my part, I never claimed to be an expert on pre-colonial Africa, so I don't appreciate your condescending attitude. The name does also have a Greek meaning though, but thanks for the information.
Apologies if i offended you. Just find it ironic that someone who starts a thread about how depressing the ignorance about pre-colonial Africa is to him turns out to be quite ignorant about it himself.

One doesn't need sources to think the term "burnt faces" as referring to people or land is offensive.

I highly doubt that, political correctness is a recent phenomenon.

Why not? Most of those colonial constructions. were built using indigenous labor, why not get rid of them? But on a less sarcastic note, why wouldn't they keep the infrastructure? Keep the good, take away the bad. Roads linking towns and cities existed in Africa before the colonial period anyway, along with schools and churches.

Africans were surviving just fine growing crops and herding livestock before Europeans sailed to Africa.
It is noted that your opinion to you is more valid than sources. Nevertheless it are sources that will cure you from your ignorance about your favourite era, not opinions.
 
Jun 2013
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canada
Apologies if i offended you. Just find it ironic that someone who starts a thread about how depressing the ignorance about pre-colonial Africa is to him turns out to be quite ignorant about it himself.



It is noted that your opinion to you is more valid than sources. Nevertheless it are sources that will cure you from your ignorance about your favourite era, not opinions.
Ignorance? In a small matter retaining to etymology, I'm suddenly ignorant about pre-colonial Africa? My definition was correct anyway, I just didn't know that it also had an indigenous meaning, but not much more than that, you see irony where none exists. I already acknowledged your information, yet you continue to be condescending.

I never stated my own opinion was more important than a source, I simply said I don't need one to form an opinion, in this particular matter. Interesting, you see irony where is doesn't exist, in addition to seeing things which have not been said. it's possible the Greek definition was not meant to be offensive, but that doesn't really matter to who its pertaining to. I can't imagine a positive way in which someone could be complimented in having a burnt face.
 

Ancientgeezer

Ad Honorem
Nov 2011
8,899
The Dustbin, formerly, Garden of England
Renaming Luderitz !naminus is hilarious. The "!" sound is a Bushman click and I bet that there are barely a couple of thousand people outside of Southern Africa who can accurately repeat it. Even Nguni speakers have trouble, just like the "/" click. It took me years to learn the Zulu clicks and I have never really mastered the saliva-smacking cheek ones, one really has to learn them from infanthood.
The renaming in South Africa has become absolutely tiresome and purely a conceit of petty communist bureaucrats. There were essentially no cities in Southern Africa before the colonial period-- a few larger villages with chief's kraals, like Ulundi. ThabaNchu and Bulawayo retained their names--in fact I cannot thing of a single African mane that was "Europeanised".
Calling Petersburg- Polokwane, Edenvale-Ekurhuleni, Haatebeesfontein, Lethabong just causes confusion and buggers up the Sat-Nav. None of the nanes were traditional, nor are they chosen with any consistency as some names are Tsonga, some Pedi, some Tswana, some Zulu, some Xhosa, usually with no connection to the pepole who actually live there and everyone, including most balck people are just annoyed and confused.
It also leads to some amusing faux pas. The communists want to call Pretoria, Tswane (in fact they have renamed the municipal area, but not the downtown city centre (yet). When the origin of the name was called into question it appears that before the city was founded a small native settlement existed alongside a river, then called "tswane"
--the Voortrekkers simply translated this name as bobbiansrivier--baboon river, suggesting that Pretoria is now Baboon Town--possibly apt all things considered.
 

mansamusa

Ad Honorem
Mar 2012
3,308
Ignorance? In a small matter retaining to etymology, I'm suddenly ignorant about pre-colonial Africa? My definition was correct anyway, I just didn't know that it also had an indigenous meaning, but not much more than that, you see irony where none exists. I already acknowledged your information, yet you continue to be condescending.

I never stated my own opinion was more important than a source, I simply said I don't need one to form an opinion, in this particular matter. Interesting, you see irony where is doesn't exist, in addition to seeing things which have not been said. it's possible the Greek definition was not meant to be offensive, but that doesn't really matter to who its pertaining to. I can't imagine a positive way in which someone could be complimented in having a burnt face.

I personally see nothing wrong with the name of Ethiopia. Its an ancient name that the Ethiopians may have chosen for themselves after converting to Christianity in order to associate their country with the Ethiopia of the bible. As the name originally referred to what is now modern day Sudan. Names like Lake Victoria or Victoria Falls on the other hand seem certainly ridiculous.
 
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Ancientgeezer

Ad Honorem
Nov 2011
8,899
The Dustbin, formerly, Garden of England
I personally see nothing wrong with the name of Ethiopia. Its an ancient name that the Ethiopians may have chosen for themselves after converting to Christianity in order to associate their country with the Ethiopia of the bible. As the name originally referred to what is now modern day Sudan. Names like Lake Victoria or Victoria Falls on the other hand seem certainly ridiculous.
If you called the Falls Mosi-oa-Tunya, the tourists wouldn't come.
By the way, the native name for Lake Victoria is Viktoria Nyanza
 

mansamusa

Ad Honorem
Mar 2012
3,308
If you called the Falls Mosi-oa-Tunya, the tourists wouldn't come.
By the way, the native name for Lake Victoria is Viktoria Nyanza
with these frequent and rather impressive geography lessons of yours you would make a great teacher of geography.