Why Orthodox countries did not have a Renaissance Movement?

Valens

Ad Honorem
Feb 2014
8,303
Colonia Valensiana
Orthodox countries were already under the influence of Ancient Greek (and Roman) culture via the influence of Byzantine Empire, which was the main bearer of Ancient culture and civilization throughout the whole of its existence. Those peoples who received Christianity from Constantinople received distinct Byzantine influences in culture, language, court ceremonial, architecture, art... Byzantine culture itself was a result of the merging of Christian faith with Greco-Roman civilization.

Renaissance in the West was prompted by the rediscovery of ancient Greek and Roman knowledge, the Byzantines never had to rediscover it. Byzantine scholars and artists had always kept ancient culture alive (even though in new, Christian form). Byzantine writers and chronicles knew all the works of Homer for example, works of Greek and Roman philosophers, it had always been an essence of Byzantine culture.
 
Jun 2015
177
Marseille, Bouches-du-Rhône | France
Orthodox countries were already under the influence of Ancient Greek (and Roman) culture via the influence of Byzantine Empire, which was the main bearer of Ancient culture and civilization throughout the whole of its existence. Those peoples who received Christianity from Constantinople received distinct Byzantine influences in culture, language, court ceremonial, architecture, art... Byzantine culture itself was a result of the merging of Christian faith with Greco-Roman civilization.

Renaissance in the West was prompted by the rediscovery of ancient Greek and Roman knowledge, the Byzantines never had to rediscover it. Byzantine scholars and artists had always kept ancient culture alive (even though in new, Christian form). Byzantine writers and chronicles knew all the works of Homer for example, works of Greek and Roman philosophers, it had always been an essence of Byzantine culture.
Exactly.
 
Apr 2015
319
Canada
Orthodox countries were already under the influence of Ancient Greek (and Roman) culture via the influence of Byzantine Empire, which was the main bearer of Ancient culture and civilization throughout the whole of its existence. Those peoples who received Christianity from Constantinople received distinct Byzantine influences in culture, language, court ceremonial, architecture, art... Byzantine culture itself was a result of the merging of Christian faith with Greco-Roman civilization.

Renaissance in the West was prompted by the rediscovery of ancient Greek and Roman knowledge, the Byzantines never had to rediscover it. Byzantine scholars and artists had always kept ancient culture alive (even though in new, Christian form). Byzantine writers and chronicles knew all the works of Homer for example, works of Greek and Roman philosophers, it had always been an essence of Byzantine culture.
I'm not entirely sure that this was the case. The Orthodox countries did not have any real progress or advancement in art, science, or philosophy, despite having close connections to Greek and Byzantine culture. Most Orthodox countries (particularly Russia) were backward in comparison to Western Europe.
 
Jun 2015
177
Marseille, Bouches-du-Rhône | France
The Orthodox countries did not have any real progress or advancement in art, science, or philosophy, despite having close connections to Greek and Byzantine culture.
Excuse me, but your statements above were inaccurate and kinda reckless. I suggest you to familiarise yourself with the important Byzantine contributions in these fields. Maybe these articles are a good start.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byzantine_architecture

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byzantine_medicine

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byzantine_art
 

Valens

Ad Honorem
Feb 2014
8,303
Colonia Valensiana
I'm not entirely sure that this was the case. The Orthodox countries did not have any real progress or advancement in art, science, or philosophy, despite having close connections to Greek and Byzantine culture. Most Orthodox countries (particularly Russia) were backward in comparison to Western Europe.
Orthodox countries in the Balkans and Russian principalities had been conquered by Eastern invaders in the mid-Renaissance period. Russian lands had overthrown the invaders by the early XVI century, while other Orthodox lands were under the rule of the Ottoman Empire until the XIX century.

I don't know what is your basis for a claim that Russia did not have progress in art, science and philosophy. Russia had developed distinctive art, architecture and literature.
 
Last edited:
Apr 2015
319
Canada
Excuse me, but your statements above were inaccurate and kinda reckless. I suggest you to familiarise yourself with the important Byzantine contributions in these fields. Maybe these articles are a good start.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byzantine_architecture

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byzantine_medicine

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byzantine_art
I meant Orthodox countries other than Byzantium. I thought it was obvious that Byzantium was the only Orthodox country that really did have the advanced architecture, medicine, and art.
 
Apr 2015
319
Canada
Orthodox countries in the Balkans and Russian principalities had been conquered by Eastern invaders in the mid-Renaissance period. Russian lands had overthrown the invaders by the early XVI century, while other Orthodox lands were under the rule of the Ottoman Empire until the XIX century.

I don't know what is your basis for a claim that Russia did not have progress in art, science and philosophy. Russia had developed distinctive art, architecture and literature.
Most things that Russia had before the 18th century, they had in Kievan Rus. There was very little progress in architecture, medicine, or art.
 

constantine

Ad Honorem
Oct 2012
8,545
Most things that Russia had before the 18th century, they had in Kievan Rus. There was very little progress in architecture, medicine, or art.
With the fall of Constantinople the Greek world and much of the Balkans fell under Ottoman occupation. And Russia in the 15th century, despite the aspirations of Philotheus of Pskov, was in no position to take its place as the centre of Orthodox Civilization; even under Ottoman occupation Constantinople remained the centre or Orthodox Civilization and arguably does to this day (though the Russians may not all agree).

Russia (or actually Muscovy, at the time) wasn't even able to throw off the Mongol yoke until the reign of Ivan the Great in the late 15th century and required considerable internal reorganization to even function as a modern state; it took most of the 16th century to accomplish this. Russia didn't really have the internal stability, to say nothing of wealth, required for cultural growth until the rise of the House of Romanov in the 17th century and then we do see Russian culture flourish.

The Italian city-states were wealthy and, relatively, stable in the 15th century, they had the political conditions necessary to sustain a renaissance of ancient culture. The Muscovites still fighting the hordes on the frontiers of Europe didn't enjoy the same luxury.