why they declared them as saints? newest?

Mar 2014
187
Europe
1. What is a complete list of reasons someone can be declared saint after death? Is there difference today/vs in the past or in different parts of Europe/somewhere else?

2. Can someone be declared as a saint even today? If yes, how can I the list of the newest saints?
 
Sep 2015
1,711
Romania
Essentially, you need to be a pretty cool, pious guy to be a saint. Doesn't matter where you are from, what gender or age you are, etc.

People can become saints even today.
 
Apr 2015
1,705
Italy
Plus you have to have miracles, "confirmed" miracles.
Yep. and it's such a Facepalm moment when you go read the supposed miracles modern saints have made. It's truly something that should make you smell the hoax and run away from religion. Saints of the past according to official documents were fighting dragons, raising people from the death, making limbs regrow and so on, that at least was something. Modern saints appears to you in your dreams and heal you, wich is something you can't have any proof of. In everything about religions, the more you go back in time the more the claims are more supernatural and amazing. The more you come closer to modern days, the more the knowledge and the more the evidences you can gather the more miracles became less and less to the point of disappearing.

Curch set the standard for becoming a saint by itself so they have to stick with it, that's one of their best own goals. For example, everybody knows Mother Teresa. They of course want to make her a saint.
But they have to find miracles she's involved:
http://vaticaninsider.lastampa.it/en/world-news/detail/articolo/madre-teresa-mother-teresa-madre-teresa-brasile-brazil-brasil-41750/
well, you would think that a true saint, who spent her whole life in contact with ill people would have healed some of them here in there with her powers derived from her sanctity. Apparently not. All they were able to find was a guy with a tumor that said "i praied to mother teresa and the tumor was gone". No need to demonstrate a cause effect relation between the two events, no care about the millions of people that pray to her everyday for miracles and get ignored, no need to verify if the claim of the man was true and if he prayed to other saints too. Curch once again going full Medieval.

i think we should have the right in 2015 to call this nonsense with its proper name
 
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Oct 2014
392
Germany
Pope John Paul II became a saint in probably record breaking time and together with him a dozen other guys.

Every few years a council declares dozens of people to saint. All at one.

To become saint, it has to be "proofed" that you did a miracle after your death. - for example, i pray to you to help be beat cancer the medicine can't treat and a few month later I'm healed.
This would be seen as a proof that you (the dead person) are very close to god and you (the dead person) asked god to help me. And god did...
 
May 2015
326
California
Here's a list of the 20th century saints and blessed in the Catholic Church.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronological_list_of_saints_and_blesseds_in_the_20th_century

You might also want to check out some of the Westminster Abbey's statues of 20th century martyrs.

These guys are so dope. Maximilian Kolbe volunteered to die in the place of another man in the German death camps of world war 2.

Princess Elisabeth of Hesse was a Russian princess known for her charitable works among the poor, for publicly forgiving the communist terrorist who killed her husband and campaigning for his pardon. After her husband's death she became a nun and sold everything she had to open a convent, hospital, orphanage, pharmacy, and chapel in Moscow. When the Bolsheviks took over, Lenin had her rounded up with the rest of the royal family and murdered. She was canonized by the Russian Orthodox Church.


Archbishop Oscar Romero is pretty much a lock for future sainthood and would have won a nobel peace prize for his work on human rights in El Salvador if he hadn't been murdered in his chapel during mass by government thugs who would later kill dozens of people when they attacked his funeral.


Pope John Paul II saved Jews from the Nazis in occupied Poland. He helped form the Solidarity movement in Poland a social movement for workers rights and social change which ultimately spread to the rest of Eastern Europe and lead to the collapse of communism and the reintroduction of democracy. He opposed the death penalty, apartheid, the Gulf War, and was instrumental in the collapse of dictatorships in Chile, Haiti, and Paraguay. Shot multiple times and forgave his attacker.
 
May 2015
326
California
I looked up some other 20th century saints.

Katharine Drexel was an heiress who inherited what would today be more than 100 million dollars and promptly became a nun spending her fortune building schools for Native and African Americans.


Filippo Smaldone created an institution where he devoted his life to helping the deaf, the blind, orphans, and the sick.


Alberto Hurtado built shelters for homeless children in Chile and was active in the labor movement.


Pope John XXIII worked as a stretcher bearer and chaplain in WWI. Used his office as apostolic delegate in Turkey to help the Jewish underground and thousands of refugees from Europe in the late 1930s. During WWII he used his office as Apostolic Nuncio to save many Jews from the Holocaust by issuing immigration certificates, baptisms of convenience certificates, and working with political connections to have many Jews in concentration camps spared. Called for massive reforms in Vatican II to the whole of the church, making it modern, progressive, and ecumenical.


Mother Teresa built hospices for people with AIDS, leprosy, tuberculosis. She built soup kitchens, dispensaries, mobile clinics, orphanages, and schools.


But there have been other modern saints outside the Roman Catholic Church.

Mohandas Ghandi deserves to be numbered among the Hindu saints for his work with nonviolent passive resistance to British rule of India (for which he spent much of his life in jail), his fasts to stop the violence between India and Pakistan, his civil rights work in South Africa, building communes, working for women's rights, and social reforms to issues like poverty.


Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. campaigned for civil rights, like Ghandi using nonviolence, spending time in jail, leading marches, boycotting and demonstrating, and like Ghandi was also killed for his beliefs.


The Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu are two living saints who've received the Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts. Desmond Tutu is known for his civil rights work in South Africa, opposition to apartheid, defense of human rights, his work on reconciliation after the end of apartheid, and campaign to fight AIDS. Tenzin Gyatsu, the 14th Dalai Lama is known for his advocacy for the Tibetan people, women's rights, and non-violence.


Thích Nhất Hạnh is a Vietnamese Buddhist monk peace activist and leader of the Engaged Buddhism movement which seeks solutions to social, political, environmental, and economic suffering.


Abraham Joshua Heschel was a Jewish rabbi, theologian, philosopher, and American civil rights advocate in the sixties who marched with Dr. King.

(Heschel is second from the right.)
 
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Apr 2015
1,705
Italy
note that the not christian guys mentioned above like Gandhi and the vietnamese monk are rotting in hell according to catholic doctrine cause they didn't accept Jesus as their saviour.
And that in a nutshell is their superior morality they always talk about.
 
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May 2015
326
California
note that the not christian guys mentioned above like Gandhi and the vietnamese monk are rotting in hell according to catholic doctrine cause they didn't accept Jesus as their saviour.
And that in a nutshell is their superior morality they always talk about.
Pope Francis has made several remarks that make it sound like he thinks even atheists may be saved if they are righteous. Kallistos Ware, a Greek Orthodox bishop, has said this about the matter:

"Extra Ecclesiam nulla salus. All the categorical strength and point of this aphorism lies in its tautology. Outside the Church there is no salvation, because salvation is the Church" (G. Florovsky, "Sobornost: the Catholicity of the Church", in The Church of God, p. 53). Does it therefore follow that anyone who is not visibly within the Church is necessarily damned? Of course not; still less does it follow that everyone who is visibly within the Church is necessarily saved. As Augustine wisely remarked: "How many sheep there are without, how many wolves within!" (Homilies on John, 45, 12) While there is no division between a "visible" and an "invisible Church", yet there may be members of the Church who are not visibly such, but whose membership is known to God alone. If anyone is saved, he must in some sense be a member of the Church; in what sense, we cannot always say.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extra_Ecclesiam_nulla_salus

If you'll recall Jesus in the Harrowing of Hell descends into the underworld to free the righteous souls of pagans who came before him. Also, there is a precedent in the Old Testament where several non-Jewish prophets of the Lord are referred to, like Balaam, Beor, and Job, implying that God has a different plan, and a different message for different peoples. I can't help but think that Buddha, Mohammad, Zoroaster, and Confucius, are the kinds of guys these texts refer to. I don't see any problem with being pluralistic and viewing men like Ramakrishna as a modern saint.
 
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