Why were Christian Germans separated by Pagan Germans?

Oct 2017
186
United States
#1
Ok so this is something that I don't quite understand, maybe because I don't quite understand the first part..

But basically one understanding I have is that the Teutonic Knights, a Christian German military order, was mostly present on the east and northern coasts of Germany and really in many ways can be considered I guess a Baltic organization.

Meanwhile, hundreds of miles west, you have Franks which are also Christian in their influence and so on...

And then in between, Saxon, Angles, all the non-Christian Germans...

Is it possible that the areas were all Christian Germans, and then the Saxons and other groups basically pulverized right through the middle, giving Germany a more Pagan flair as opposed to the Christian influences at the sides... or...

Maybe they all had lots of conversations and just kinda moved around in these ways and that's how it shakes out...

There's also the Polish issue... which I do not think about as much since it's very controversial :persevere:
 
Sep 2016
556
天下
#2
You are mixing up the chronology. Teutons arrived in Prussia only in 13th century on invitation of Polish prince. By that time Germany was firmly Christian and there were no Germans yet in the Baltic era.
 
Oct 2012
677
#3
You are mixing up the chronology. Teutons arrived in Prussia only in 13th century on invitation of Polish prince. By that time Germany was firmly Christian and there were no Germans yet in the Baltic era.
Correct.The pagan Teutons and the Teutonic knights are two different things.
 
Nov 2017
866
Győr
#4
Ok so this is something that I don't quite understand, maybe because I don't quite understand the first part..

But basically one understanding I have is that the Teutonic Knights, a Christian German military order, was mostly present on the east and northern coasts of Germany and really in many ways can be considered I guess a Baltic organization.

Meanwhile, hundreds of miles west, you have Franks which are also Christian in their influence and so on...

And then in between, Saxon, Angles, all the non-Christian Germans...

Is it possible that the areas were all Christian Germans, and then the Saxons and other groups basically pulverized right through the middle, giving Germany a more Pagan flair as opposed to the Christian influences at the sides... or...

Maybe they all had lots of conversations and just kinda moved around in these ways and that's how it shakes out...

There's also the Polish issue... which I do not think about as much since it's very controversial :persevere:
They were not Germans yet, but various branches of continental Germanic speaking groups. It is not the same!!!
 
Nov 2017
866
Győr
#6
You are mixing up the chronology. Teutons arrived in Prussia only in 13th century on invitation of Polish prince. By that time Germany was firmly Christian and there were no Germans yet in the Baltic era.
Teutons had to move Poland, because the King Andrew II (the earliest overlord of the masters of Teutonic order) expelled them by force from Hungary.
 
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