Why were Egypt and Morocco reluctant to help Granada?

Shaheen

Ad Honorem
May 2011
2,538
Sweden
#11
A very informative documentary on Al Andalus by BBC. It kind of reflects what you just said Efendi, that the emphasis in Al Andalus was more on culture and less on the military. That is not to say of course that the Ottomans did not have a rich culture, not at all but Cordoba (Qurtubah) really was the center of learning at its time.

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0IaCK-7z5o"]An Islamic History of Europe (full documentary; produced by BBC) - YouTube[/ame]
 
Jul 2011
2,749
#12
The peninsula could be deliberated much sooner. But firstly, the rulers of the Christian kingdom was used to berating very much.Secondly, the strength of Cordoba loomed because of magnificent culture, thereby Hispanic abstained devouring Muslims on the Peninsula.
 
Feb 2010
1,563
#13
The peninsula could be deliberated much sooner. But firstly, the rulers of the Christian kingdom was used to berating very much.Secondly, the strength of Cordoba loomed because of magnificent culture, thereby Hispanic abstained devouring Muslims on the Peninsula.
Pavel, could you rephrase your post? I can't understand what are you saying here. :confused:
 
Nov 2010
7,648
Cornwall
#14
The peninsula could be deliberated much sooner. But firstly, the rulers of the Christian kingdom was used to berating very much.Secondly, the strength of Cordoba loomed because of magnificent culture, thereby Hispanic abstained devouring Muslims on the Peninsula.
Whatever you are saying Cordoba has nothing much to do with the Nazari Kingdom of Granada. The peak of the Caliphate was just before the turn of the Milennium whereas Granada fell in the 1482-92 war, and Cordoba had long fallen to the christians (1236?).

In answer to the OP the states mentioned did ship across the odd supplies and fanatics etc. But you cant compare these places to the monstrous power that Fernando and Isabel built up to conquer Granada. Not in the same league at all.

Also just because states were of the same religion they didn't necessarily like each other! The history of both Spain and the Holy Land is riddled with examples of inter-religion alliances against other inter-religion alliances!

The poster mentioning disunity is also spot on. Politics were horrendous and, having studied this period quite extensively, I often wonder what may have been possible without Boabdil's rebelliousness, mistakes and general idiocy - EG getting captured and losing his outstanding general in a mindlessly stupid attack on Lucena. What if all were pulling in the right direction? Considering their relative weakness and these internal strifes they still put up quite a good show over the 10 years. Inevitable sure, but given the right leadership........
 

Efendi

Ad Honoris
Jul 2009
12,418
Anatolia
#15
A very informative documentary on Al Andalus by BBC. It kind of reflects what you just said Efendi, that the emphasis in Al Andalus was more on culture and less on the military. That is not to say of course that the Ottomans did not have a rich culture, not at all but Cordoba (Qurtubah) really was the center of learning at its time.
I agree my friend. I wish she survived. It would be good for human civilization.
 
Nov 2010
2,088
...
#16
Egypt agreed to assist the Gujarati. They sent fleets right off the coast of western India and confronted the Portuguese in 1508 and 1509. Sixteen years after the fall of Moorish Granada, yes, but the Turks incapacitated, no. Seems the Nasrids were just that isolated.
 

Shaheen

Ad Honorem
May 2011
2,538
Sweden
#17
Egypt agreed to assist the Gujarati. They sent fleets right off the coast of western India and confronted the Portuguese in 1508 and 1509. Sixteen years after the fall of Moorish Granada, yes, but the Turks incapacitated, no. Seems the Nasrids were just that isolated.
The Ottomans also participated in the wars against the Portuguese in the Indian ocean, refer to the Battle of Diu. The reason I believe they did this is because the Ottomans own control on the spice trade was being threatened by the Europeans who avoided Ottoman lands and instead crossed the Cape down south and then straight up to the Indian coastal cities. All that trade from South/Central Asia + even China would now be bypassing Ottoman taxes on their way to Western Europe. So the alliance with Gujrat had more to do with mutual interest then just Islamic solidarity. Granada on the other was a lost cause, with no clear interest in the Ottomans favour. Nevertheless they evacuated thousands and thousands of oppressed Iberian Muslims to the coasts of N. Africa, especially Barbarossa.
 
Last edited:
Nov 2010
7,648
Cornwall
#19
Dont forget that over the last couple of centuries and more, after the Battle of Las Navas de Tolosa, 'moorish' lands in Spain were vassals of the powerful christian states anyway, Nazarí Granada being a tributary to Castille. Now and again they failed to pay the tribute on time to assert a bit of authority among their people, but basically the writing was on the wall for muslim Spain when the Almohads were smashed all the way back in 1212.

It's a shame (for the 'what if' theories) that they couldn't get any unity whilst they still had economy. After the frighteningly fast collapse of the caliphate only the Almoravid and Almohad invasions united the muslims under one banner. The 'Spanish' moorish kingdoms seemed totally unable to co-operate to any extent between Taifas, and alliances with christian states were almost as likely as with your neighbour muslim. One suspects the whole muslim world was similarly politically divided and this goes some way to answering the OP. Of course, most notably prior to Las Navas, the christian kingdoms were similarly divided and likely to war with each other.

Even back in the 10th century lords of the borderslands, 'campos', like Garcia Gomez de Saldaña allied themselves with Almansur (before a later fallout) against León, not out of any treachery, but out of personal antipathy, political expediency and financial sense. He hated the king of León more than the Caliph.

Whilst nowadays we can see no further than the black & white argument, Muslim v Christian, Spain was not politically like that.
 

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