Why weren't the 9/11 hijackers native Afghans?

Aug 2016
912
US&A
#1
I had to do a project on Islamophobia for college. While I was reading our text, I found it a little odd that people would associate Arabs so much with Islam. After all, 9/11 was committed by the Afghan organization Al-Qaeda, right? Osama Bin Laden non-withstanding, I assumed a lot of people would at least know that Afghans and Arabs are usually not the same. So, I looked up the nationality of the hijackers and discovered that zero of them are actually from Afghanistan.

I wouldn't have been surprised to find a few non-afghans in there, but I didn't expect all of them to be that way. Was Osama just unable to find people capable of learning to fly an airplane in Afghanistan? As mentioned, I know he comes from Saudi Arabia, but he'd been ousted from there and his base was still in Afghanistan. Also, while Afghanistan was a poor country with little education available, it still seems like Osama would've been able to find somebody able to pass as an American immigrant or foreign tourist at least.
 
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Oct 2015
204
Singapore
#2
I had to do a project on Islamophobia for college. While I was reading our text, I found it a little odd that people would associate Arabs so much with Islam. After all, 9/11 was committed by the Afghan organization Al-Qaeda, right? Osama Bin Laden non-withstanding, I assumed a lot of people would at least know that Afghans and Arabs are usually not the same. So, I looked up the nationality of the hijackers and discovered that zero of them are actually from Afghanistan.

I wouldn't have been surprised to find a few non-afghans in there, but I didn't expect all of them to be that way. Was Osama just unable to find people capable of learning to fly an airplane in Afghanistan? As mentioned, I know he comes from Saudi Arabia, but he'd been ousted from there and his base was still in Afghanistan. Also, while Afghanistan was a poor country with little education available, it still seems like Osama would've been able to find somebody able to pass as an American immigrant or foreign tourist at least.
Al-Qaeda is an Arabic word meaning base or organization. The group was founded as an Arabic group to fight the Soviets in Afghanistan and was mostly Saudi or Egypt with Saudi and Pakistani Intelligence, and debateable CIA support. Later Osama bin Laden, under the influence of Ayman Zarqawi, an Egyptian terrorist, expanded the group to fight the non-Muslim world.
 
May 2015
1,036
The Netherlands
#3
I had to do a project on Islamophobia for college. While I was reading our text, I found it a little odd that people would associate Arabs so much with Islam. After all, 9/11 was committed by the Afghan organization Al-Qaeda, right? Osama Bin Laden non-withstanding, I assumed a lot of people would at least know that Afghans and Arabs are usually not the same. So, I looked up the nationality of the hijackers and discovered that zero of them are actually from Afghanistan.

I wouldn't have been surprised to find a few non-afghans in there, but I didn't expect all of them to be that way. Was Osama just unable to find people capable of learning to fly an airplane in Afghanistan? As mentioned, I know he comes from Saudi Arabia, but he'd been ousted from there and his base was still in Afghanistan. Also, while Afghanistan was a poor country with little education available, it still seems like Osama would've been able to find somebody able to pass as an American immigrant or foreign tourist at least.
Where did you get the idea that Al Qaeda is an Afghan organisation? Al Qaeda, to the extent that you can speak of it as an actual organisation, sought refuge in Afghanistan after being kicked out of Sudan by the Sudanese government in the mid-nineties. It has always been predominently Arab.
 
Likes: Futurist
Mar 2016
1,079
Australia
#4
Where did you get the idea that Al Qaeda is an Afghan organisation? Al Qaeda, to the extent that you can speak of it as an actual organisation, sought refuge in Afghanistan after being kicked out of Sudan by the Sudanese government in the mid-nineties. It has always been predominently Arab.
Definitely seems like an odd oversight for someone studying the topic at an academic level to make. Then again the topic is "Islamaphobia" so we can't expect much to begin with...
 

robto

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,986
Lisbon, Portugal
#6
Definitely seems like an odd oversight for someone studying the topic at an academic level to make. Then again the topic is "Islamaphobia" so we can't expect much to begin with...
Islamophobia as itself is a totally normal topic to study.
 
Jul 2016
1,186
Dengie Peninsula
#8
Have a look at the comments on Iranian "Press" tv. Anyone who is not strongly Arabic is a Zionist! The fact that there is a big difference between a Zionist and an Israeli does not bother their contributors.
Currently , slagging off the Wahabi and and MBS is a past time.
 

robto

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,986
Lisbon, Portugal
#9
And I've never seen it discussed in an even remotely unbiased and reasonable fashion beyond the typical rhetoric of Westerners being evil racists and bigots.
Well, that doesn't make the term being unworthy of being studied in an unbiased way.
 
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