Will other planets be colonized by short humans?

tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
13,958
I'm reading interesting works sustaining that actually Venus would be quite easy to be transformed in a Earth like planet [and its gravity is really similar, so humans would live very well on it].

But it seems that a giant ocean, with its tide, condemned the planet to its present. Theory proposes that Venus could have been habitable, but a large ocean slowed down its rotation, killing it - Universe Today
Sure ... we cant transform our own deserts, but a whole distant planet.... no problemo..... we got a crew ready

 

tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
13,958
It is now nearly 8 decades since man first landed on the moon. And what has actually happened since then?
Apparently what has happened since then is that some have forgotten the dates and/or lost their ability to count
 

tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
13,958
Neither is a viable plan. You take a crew and skeleton admin staff and you bring several thousand embryos and artificial incubators.

I dont understand why we cant preposition equipment and supplies on the target planet... say Mars..... First you send a number of cargo ships that deliver the goods..... in separate but relatively close locations....
Then you send the crew..... even if they miss the exact landing site they should not be too far from one of the prepositionned locations....
 

Dan Howard

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
4,951
Australia
I dont understand why we cant preposition equipment and supplies on the target planet... say Mars..... First you send a number of cargo ships that deliver the goods..... in separate but relatively close locations....
Then you send the crew..... even if they miss the exact landing site they should not be too far from one of the prepositionned locations....
All the prepositioned equipment in the world won't help because humans won't survive the trip.

In low gravity humans suffer bone mineralisation. Each month around 1% bone mass is lost and it doesn't grow back when they return to Earth. It takes around nine months to get to Mars so a round trip will cost you 18% PERMANENT bone mass loss. As the bones deteriorate, the calcium ends up in the bloodstream, which causes more medical problems, such as constipation, renal stones, and psychotic depression. In addition your red blood cell count plummets in low gravity causing a range of problems related to anemia.

We won't be surviving a trip to Mars until a ship is developed with a rotating section to simulate gravity. And even then we had better hope that there are no solar flares during that nine month trip.
 

tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
13,958
All the prepositioned equipment in the world won't help because humans won't survive the trip.

In low gravity humans suffer bone mineralisation. Each month around 1% bone mass is lost and it doesn't grow back when they return to Earth. It takes around nine months to get to Mars so a round trip will cost you 18% PERMANENT bone mass loss. As the bones deteriorate, the calcium ends up in the bloodstream, which causes more medical problems, such as constipation, renal stones, and psychotic depression. In addition your red blood cell count plummets in low gravity causing a range of problems related to anemia.

We won't be surviving a trip to Mars until a ship is developed with a rotating section to simulate gravity. And even then we had better hope that there are no solar flares during that nine month trip.
what about those guys who spent months in a space station ?
 
Jul 2017
292
Srpska
Humans will never colonize other planets. Humans are stuck here, until the next wipeout when a new cycle of life will begin.
 

Dan Howard

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
4,951
Australia
what about those guys who spent months in a space station ?
A few months is far different to 18 months. They have developed routines and programs that can delay this deterioration.
 
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VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,692
Florania
Liu Cixin is known for writing a short story about microscopic humans on earth; apparently, Liu Cixin is quite biologically illiterate.
A good read of Ed Yong's I Contain Multitudes will render such premise impossible.
Let's make a conservative assumption: we retain our level of cognitive abilities and manual dexterity in the size of Homo florensis,
can we maintain our control of Planet Earth?
Previously, females of 165cm or more were of reasonable or respectable height; currently, such height is considered "diminutive".