Windows 10: Beware of Geeks bearing gifts

larkin

Ad Honorem
Sep 2009
3,698
Windows 10: Beware of Geeks bearing gifts
Before you go and move this to lounge, I contend that if you read the final paragraphs, it is a speculative discussion as to where mass computing and data collection is going. This is not a cut+pastepiece
Why would huge corporation run the risk of alienating it's customer base by forcing an up-grade using coercive and deceptive methods?


What could be more of a dishonest trick than changing the X and the right hand corner of the dialog box into an accept and install up-grade?


What could be behind herding millions of people into something that many do not want and no one really needs?


You've have heard it before. “We are not the customers.”


Their customers are corporate interests for marketing and increasingly, the government. Microsoft is larger and more influential than many countries around the world. It is responding competitively to the rise of Google and Facebook and the needs of other governments.


As annoying as it might be to be subjected to algorithms that determine what products I like or might buy,..I can live with that but this trend is far deeper and darker.


What are Win10 objectives?
From what I can gather, Win10 is a move to establish a common platform for the myriad of devices starting with Your computer, your smart phone, your car, your house and any number of things that are not even conceived yet. Will employers keep track of all their employees? Will Cortana will tell you when to wake up and when to pay a bill and when you are overdrawn at the bank?


These are applications that are presented to us as things that will help us structure and organize our lives.


The trend in software is to stop selling their products and instead, begin renting them through the “cloud”. Adobe has developed a simple working model. They no longer sell Photoshop, they sell a subscription service at $50 or $60 per month. If you do not pay, it disappears.


I think we can count on Microsoft to follow this model. They have already announced that there will be no more up-grades. I've heard that they might charge $1 per month for the solitaire game. I am not likely to play solitaire but this tells me that Microsoft is setting up a billing regiment. We will all be paying Microsoft monthly for the privilege of turning my computer, my private property, in to a terminal for the purpose of gathering data.


As Jim Carey did at an award ceremony when he put his fore fingers up to look like devil horns and said, “IT'S PERFECT!”


What worries me more than anything is that Microsoft's primary customer is government. Even now they have established a symbiotic relationship. This is the very definition of fascism. How soon will it be before we take our orders from Cortana?


I am not against tech, I like the things that computers have brought us, but something unexpected is happening and as if in a fog, it is hard to make out. I imagined that the day may come when people flee the internet.


Looking at this situation from a futurist or Sifi point of view, you might say, maybe this is the way it is supposed to go. Perhaps we are constructing a responsive nervous system for the entire human organism? A foundation for this seems to be in the works. I believe that if this is accomplished, it will result in the death of the individual.. I would prefer not to be a part of that kind of future.
 
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deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
14,633
Europix
Well, not long I was arguing on another thread that the real Big Brother isn't the government, but a couple of private companies.

I feel somehow relieved that I'm not the only one having concerns on that. And scared in the same time, as I might be wrong.

The trend is the déplacement of the power center from the political sphere to the economical one. And that's really scary. As economical sphere is a private one, where democratic (be it only theoretical) rules do not apply.

But IMHO, the real guilt is to be found in consumers (we, that is) permanent quest of comfort.
 

d'artanian

Ad Honorem
Aug 2010
2,950
USA
Windows 10 is only one area in which technology will get us all. The other big one is retail. Combine the two and every purchase you make and every site you visit on the internet is stored in a database somewhere. Personal freedom as we have known it no longer exists. Even my bank credit card knows what I purchase every month because I earn various cash back rewards, depending on what I purchase. And, yes, going forward we will all pay for it...one way or another.
 

Gile na Gile

Ad Honorem
May 2008
4,466
Fireland
I found myself chuckling in triumph the other day that "the internet" still doesn't know I've got a new mobile phone number.

How "it" knew the old one I'm still not terribly sure as I'm not in the habit of giving it out willy-nilly but each time sundry seemingly unconnected sites display it for my 'user convenience' (for rapid notifications, confirmation of this or that etc..) - apart from wishing to put a cyber arm through the screen and strangle whatever anonymous corporate hack has pawned my info - it does make you pause to reflect how rapidly we've acquired all the trappings of a pan-global surveillance state.

What's next - GPS activated airborne corporate drones vaporising you on the spot for buying their rival's products?
 

Solidaire

Ad Honorem
Aug 2009
5,629
Athens, Greece
I am concerned too. And agree with Tuner, the ultimate blame lies with the citizens that will accept such machinations.

I was a victim of this forced upgrade to windows 10: in the middle of my work, a message popped up to install win 10. I pressed the X button, but the procedure started regardless. My computer, an invaluable tool in my job (nothing works without it) was hijacked. I couldn't do anything about it and waited for it to finish. I was infuriated and greatly puzzled at the same time, as never before was a program forced on me one way or the other, there was always an option to accept or decline. I even considered pressing charges, as this kind of behaviour from Microsoft could lead to severe damage in my work. I suppose that other professionals that rely on their computers might have faced similar problems. Anyway, when the installation was finished, I was asked if I accept the terms of the new windows. I declined, and the computer was rolled back to my current version.

If Microsoft continues like this, I might have to consider using Linux, or any other less intrusive program that might come along in the future. And I agree 100% with larkin. We have to be wary of geeks bearing gifts.
 
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May 2016
811
Vatican occupied America
It's much worse than you think. Windows 10 records everything you say and has a keylogger recording every stroke you type and records every file you download. They've also given themselves the right to take and share all of that info. Windows 10 is the worst trojan imaginable. Windows has never been secure either. It loads all files when you're using it not just the ones you're using (one of the reasons it's such a resource hog and is slower than linux, because windows has always been designed for them and the NSA to spy upon one it also opens several ports anytime one goes online instead of just the one you're using. All of these open ports can be used by any hacker to get into your system and take any info they want off of it too. Anyone who has ever dealt with that greedy sociopath Bill Gates has been betrayed - he's exactly like the game of thrones Little Finger! Deal with the Devil be destroyed and damned like the rest ;).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLiozMpqV80
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
27,366
Italy, Lago Maggiore
I'm just using a computer with Win X ... the way to use it and not to be used by it it's simple: use it.

I haven't activate Cortana because I tend to agree that it's a bit too pervasive [you can avoid to activate it ...] and I orientate the OS in the direction I want, not the other way round.

Regarding logs, Win X is not worse than internet [and regardless which is the OS on your computer once to navigate ...], so I don't mind that much.

About NSA, I'm still imagine how much time it takes for a low level NSA operator to get from the place where he/she parks his/her car to the office! [May be I have to add something: I don't know if you are familiar with the enormous prehistorical 2D car parking of NSA headquarters ... google about!].
 

larkin

Ad Honorem
Sep 2009
3,698
Well, not long I was arguing on another thread that the real Big Brother isn't the government, but a couple of private companies.

I feel somehow relieved that I'm not the only one having concerns on that. And scared in the same time, as I might be wrong.

The trend is the déplacement of the power center from the political sphere to the economical one. And that's really scary. As economical sphere is a private one, where democratic (be it only theoretical) rules do not apply.

But IMHO, the real guilt is to be found in consumers (we, that is) permanent quest of comfort.
I will not disagree but the time will come when you can't tell the difference.
 

larkin

Ad Honorem
Sep 2009
3,698
Windows 10 is only one area in which technology will get us all. The other big one is retail. Combine the two and every purchase you make and every site you visit on the internet is stored in a database somewhere. Personal freedom as we have known it no longer exists. Even my bank credit card knows what I purchase every month because I earn various cash back rewards, depending on what I purchase. And, yes, going forward we will all pay for it...one way or another.
I was using Microsoft as a prominent example. There others like Google, Facebook, the N5A and ones that have not emerged yet.
The question is where is this going. We are no longer customers, we are becoming cells in an organism.
It is fine if you are in the middle of the flock but those on the fringes could ultimately be in danger.
 

larkin

Ad Honorem
Sep 2009
3,698
I found myself chuckling in triumph the other day that "the internet" still doesn't know I've got a new mobile phone number.

How "it" knew the old one I'm still not terribly sure as I'm not in the habit of giving it out willy-nilly but each time sundry seemingly unconnected sites display it for my 'user convenience' (for rapid notifications, confirmation of this or that etc..) - apart from wishing to put a cyber arm through the screen and strangle whatever anonymous corporate hack has pawned my info - it does make you pause to reflect how rapidly we've acquired all the trappings of a pan-global surveillance state.

What's next - GPS activated airborne corporate drones vaporising you on the spot for buying their rival's products?
All of these entities are insisting on having your cell # and some will not let you pass without it.