Without the World Wars, is there going to be much more resistance to large-scale non-White immigration in Western Europe, North America,and Australia?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
17,733
SoCal
#1
Without the World Wars, is there going to be much more resistance to large-scale non-White immigration in Western Europe, North America, Australia, and New Zealand right now?
 
Oct 2015
204
Singapore
#2
Without the World Wars, is there going to be much more resistance to large-scale non-White immigration in Western Europe, North America, Australia, and New Zealand right now?
Well, there will be less need for immigration. Assuming no plague in Europe or some contagious disease, the people who died in WWI and WWII will instead make babies, plus no WWII no Israel meaning that the Jews would still be in Europe, so there will be an increase in population. If there is no World Wars there might instead be overpopulation, meaning that there will of course be opposition to immigration, they would say that Europe is overcrowded.
 
Likes: Futurist
Aug 2014
4,343
Australia
#3
Australia's non-white migrant intake would have been the same regardless of the wars. The "White Australia" policy started to be dismantled in the 1950s but it remained largely in place until the 1960s and wasn't completely abandoned until 1973. If there were no world wars we would have taken less immigrants in total but their ethnicities would have been the same
 
Last edited:
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
17,733
SoCal
#4
Australia's non-white migrant intake would have been the same regardless of the wars. The "White Australia" policy started to be dismantled in the 1950s but it remained largely in place until the 1960s and wasn't completely abandoned until 1973. If there were no world wars we would have taken less immigrants in total but their ethnicities would have been the same
How much did the weakening and abolition of the White Australia policy have to do with the World Wars, though?
 
Aug 2014
4,343
Australia
#5
How much did the weakening and abolition of the White Australia policy have to do with the World Wars, though?
It might have changed our thoughts on what was meant to be white. Before World War II, southern Europeans such as Greeks and Italians were not considered to be "white" and so were excluded under the White Australia policy. After the war, we started to accept them in large numbers.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
17,733
SoCal
#6
It might have changed our thoughts on what was meant to be white. Before World War II, southern Europeans such as Greeks and Italians were not considered to be "white" and so were excluded under the White Australia policy. After the war, we started to accept them in large numbers.
Do you have a source for Australians not considering Greeks and Italians to be White before WWII?
 
Aug 2014
4,343
Australia
#7
Look up the Immigration Restriction Act after it was revised in 1905. It was still in place in 1926 because we have a letter written by Premier P. Collier, of Western Australia to the Prime Minister’s Department in that year. He stated that "Southern Europeans, were arriving in the state in increasing numbers", and that it was “contrary” to the revised Act of 1905.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
17,733
SoCal
#8
Look up the Immigration Restriction Act after it was revised in 1905. It was still in place in 1926 because we have a letter written by Premier P. Collier, of Western Australia to the Prime Minister’s Department in that year. He stated that "Southern Europeans, were arriving in the state in increasing numbers", and that it was “contrary” to the revised Act of 1905.
Thanks.