Words that don't have translations in English

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,654
San Antonio, Tx
Thing is there apparently was no equivalent word in English so they used the Dutch with an English pronunciation.

Same with words like apartheid.
Not really. Apartheid just means the state or condition of being separated. In this case, separated along racial lines.
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,654
San Antonio, Tx
Strangely enough there is also no translation of the Dutch word “gezelligheid” or its derivations. Closest I can come up with is enjoyment of a social occasion with chitchat , but even that doesn’t cover it entirely.

Vice versa I don’t know any translation of the American word ”joiner” used to describe a person that can easily join in on any group.
Gezellig is really cosy in English but there are a couple of other words that come close.
 

Linschoten

Ad Honoris
Aug 2010
16,210
Welsh Marches
The same is said about gemütlich in German, such words can have a shade of meaning that is not quite conveyed in comparable words in other languages.
 
Apr 2018
979
Upland, Sweden
"Kallprat", in Swedish.

Literally meaning "Cold talk". The closest english equivalent would be "chit-chat", but it doesn't quite convey the same casual disdain towards the phenomenon of small-talk...
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,654
San Antonio, Tx
Kindergarden is a loanword from German also. Though i have no idea why you dont use children's garden instead or something similar.
Kindergarten in the US is before elementary or primary school. Attendance is not manadatory but hey, Mom needs a break.
 
Nov 2016
1,038
Germany
Yes, but it's not quite same; c.f. home and Heimat
A one hundred percent correspondence is certainly impossible, but the several German translation variants of ´cosy´ (gemütlich / kuschelig / behaglich / angenehm / bequem / heimelig / gastlich / wohlig / lauschig / intim / traulich etc.) strongly suggest that ´cosy´ and ´gemütlich´ are 95 percent identical, which in practice means almost completely, especially since the term ´gemütlich´ has a slightly different connotation even for each German individual. For example, a mountain farmer will have different associations than a university professor or a punk or hooligan. The differences within the group of native speakers are no less important than the differences between different languages.

As far as ´Heimat´ is concerned, you're certainly right. There doesn't seem to be an adequate English word for that.