Words that don't have translations in English

Sep 2012
3,782
Bulgaria
#22
Right, but its a synonym for rotten correct? This kind of leads back to the idiom thing. Like I associate the word rotten with evil, because of the idiom 'rotten to the core'. I'm just wondering what influence that has as well on how people think. Nothing you could really measure or track down.
Though i know a bit of russian, a bit rusty in the moment i am afraid we should ask a native speaker. I understand the back-translation of flesh as meat and spirit as alcohol (vodka?) and even strong as good / it's connected with the noun - vodka silnaia (transliteration from cyrillic alphabet) & vodka horoshaia (transliteration) - good, strong alcohol / the connection between weak and rotten is a bit of mystery to me. My theory is that it is connected with mistranslation of the noun flesh : miaso protuhlo, gniloe miaso (transliterations) - rotten meat. I dont want to bore you with linguistic details. IMHO there is no direct connection between weak and rotten in this language.
 
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Jul 2018
58
Gaa-waabaabiganikaag
#24
My theory is that it is connected with mistranslation of the noun flesh : miaso protuhlo, gniloe miaso (transliterations) - rotten meat.
Ah, that makes sense to me, the adjective being changed to suit the noun. But I did type weak in google and had it translate into Russian, the Russian translation that was given for weak, definitely had rotten listed as a synonym, but this might just refer to the "weakness" or "weak" state of a flesh or meat. You could definitely call rotten meat a "weak" form of meat.
 
Oct 2015
5,222
Matosinhos Portugal
#25
In Portuguese the word meaning ( Dor ) it is suffering

for example, headache - Dor, de Cabeça
for example, toothache -Dor, de Dentes
For example, pain of mother, she suffers with her children, here in this text is a sentimental pain
 

Ficino

Ad Honorem
Apr 2012
6,925
Romania
#26
In Portuguese the word meaning ( Dor ) it is suffering

for example, headache - Dor, de Cabeça
for example, toothache -Dor, de Dentes
For example, pain of mother, she suffers with her children, here in this text is a sentimental pain
The Portuguese dor in Romanian is durere.

headache = durere de cap
tootache = durere de dinți
 

Vaeltaja

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
3,689
#27
Finnish: Myötähäpeä - seems to be translating into 'vicarious embarrassment' or 'secondhand embarrassment'. Essentially the feeling you have when some one is making an idiot out of themselves.
 
Mar 2017
869
Colorado
#29
Whereas a word "girlfriend" does carry an intimacy level in English, unlike German "Freundin" or Russian "подруга [podruga]".

What should one say to emphasize just the feminine gender of my friend? My female friend, she-friend?
You are absolutely correct. This is a great example.

There's an awkward phase when a relationship is starting up.
"Who's this?"
"This is Judy ... my ... uhhh .... uhhhh"
--- early in the relationship, there's no word at all. "Friend" is insulting because you're obviously avoiding "girlfriend."
"What?! You don't care about me?!!"

"Girlfriend" implies not necessarily bedroom intimacy, but a level of familiarity with time and some commitment. "Boyfriend" carries that too, but I don't think on the same level.

It's also a young-people term. "Girl" seems silly for old people to use, but there's no old equivalent. "Partner" is used a lot now and it implies commitment, but it's got a hard-edge that sounds like a business deal.

I had a girlfriend long ago. We've remained "friends" for over 40 yrs. I would never refer to her as a girlfriend now. Just "friend" works. There's not really any other word. Humorously, I sometimes refer to her as my "ex" (as in ex-girlfriend ... but this is usually only used to refer to divorced people).
 
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