Words that were/are considered offensive but which were reclaimed by people into something more positive

Jul 2019
1,078
New Jersey
Huguenot, Puritan, Tory, and Wig.

The origin of the word Huguenot is unclear, but many of the most credible theories posit that the term was at first used as a derogatory term before the French Reformed co-opted it as a positive moniker.

Puritan was also initially a mocking term used by the supporters of the Elizabethan Settlement (which Puritans thought didn't go far enough).

Tory comes from the Irish Gaelic word toraidh, or bandit, which referred to the Irish marauders who supported King James II.

Whig comes from Whiggamore, which meant a Scottish horse-driver (a reference to the Presbyterian Scots, who opposed the Catholic James II.
 
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Willempie

Ad Honorem
Jul 2015
5,709
Netherlands
Correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't Yankee an insult to the American colonists before the Revolutionary War? If yes, then it should count.
It was used for the Dutch settlers in NY (Jan-Kees, the 2 most common names).

In any case in sports it is quite common. Ie When I was younger my team (Ajax) was always hailed as "f-ing yids", by some opposing sides. Nowadays we use it ourselves
 
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Willempie

Ad Honorem
Jul 2015
5,709
Netherlands
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Feb 2019
911
Pennsylvania, US
Many of the more modern art movements' names were initially leveled at them as criticism...

- Impressionist/impressionism (too vague, too much "impression" and not enough development... something like "you see more development in a wallpaper design" was part of the critic's response)
- Fauvist/Fauvism (from the description "Donatello chez les fauves" / Donatello among the wild beasts - which was the critic's assessment of the work juxtaposed with a classical piece)
- Cubist/Cubism (from the description of the work as "bizarreries cubique" - "cubic weirdness")
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
23,561
SoCal
I think the term you're looking for is "Konvict" - as in "Konvict Muzik"

But here's a serious question for you, @Futurist ... Is it more grammatically correct to say "Thikk Konvict" or is it better to opt for "Thicc Konvict"???
It's more grammatically correct to say Thinkk Konvikt. IMHO, the creators of that music brand half-assed it by changing the first C in Convict to a K but not the second C in Convict. :( ;)