Would there have been more suburban expansion north of Seoul if South Korea's border would have been further north?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
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SoCal
Here's the scenario--instead of advancing all of the way up to the Yalu River during the Korean War, the US/UN side instead stops at the Taedong River and creates a solid defensive line there:

Taedong River - Wikipedia



If China is unable to breach this defensive line, then this would mean that the southern half of North Korea would remain in US/UN hands and become a part of South Korea. In such a scenario, would there have been much more suburban expansion north of Seoul considering that the North Korean border would have been much further north in this scenario and thus would not have been capable of being a barrier to a northward expansion of the Seoul metropolitan area?

Any thoughts on this?

Also, for the record, this map of South Korea's population density demonstrates pretty well how the North Korean border serves as an impediment to additional suburban expansion north of Seoul in real life:

https://qph.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-39dc9c106c5fd0997123eaefa07eff35.webp
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
23,789
SoCal
TBH, I think that China would have a vested interest in keeping rump North Korea intact even after the end of the Cold War.
 
Apr 2017
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U.S.A.
TBH, I think that China would have a vested interest in keeping rump North Korea intact even after the end of the Cold War.
Indeed china has made it clear they won't tolerate the west on their border. During the cold war North Korea was more of a Soviet satellite state than Chinese. After the collapse of the soviet union china became their main patron.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
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SoCal
Yeah, so basically, China would probably try its utmost best to prop up this rump North Korea for as long as possible. This actually might not be too difficult since China is much, much more populous than NK is and thus can subsidize it without much effort on its part--and this would be especially true for an even less populous rump NK.
 
Apr 2017
1,766
U.S.A.
Yeah, so basically, China would probably try its utmost best to prop up this rump North Korea for as long as possible. This actually might not be too difficult since China is much, much more populous than NK is and thus can subsidize it without much effort on its part--and this would be especially true for an even less populous rump NK.
If this happened during the Tiananmen square protests they may be too distracted to keep North Korea from collapsing and joining the south.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
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SoCal
China probably has enough troops to spare to both crush these protests and prevent NK from collapsing, though.
 
Apr 2017
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China probably has enough troops to spare to both crush these protests and prevent NK from collapsing, though.
Its not about troop numbers, its about world views. If china is crushing dissent in their capital and invading other countries (especially since North Korea was a Soviet satellite) it would draw a lot of negative attention.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
23,789
SoCal
I think that NK was largely on its own after 1956, though. That's when the Kims purged the other prominent Communists within NK. Thus, NK might not have been as receptive to developments in the USSR as the Eastern Bloc states were.
 
Apr 2017
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I think that NK was largely on its own after 1956, though. That's when the Kims purged the other prominent Communists within NK. Thus, NK might not have been as receptive to developments in the USSR as the Eastern Bloc states were.
I meant for aid purposes they relied primarily on Russia and not China at the time.
 
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