Would Troodon really have evolved into a humanoid?

Oct 2013
6,153
Planet Nine, Oregon
#21
So we were forced to expand our capacity by using brain power to invent the weapons that we lack. It's quite miraculous that we actually survived, this far....
Further OT, but the ability to throw rocks in groups was probably useful for a long time, and some have suggested helped to create the brain we have.
 

Corvidius

Ad Honorem
Jul 2017
2,551
Crows nest
#22
Further OT, but the ability to throw rocks in groups was probably useful for a long time, and some have suggested helped to create the brain we have.
Yes, with other animals often, but not always acting as individuals, a group of rock throwing apes would have an advantage. Then of course chimps hunt in groups, so the origins of this behaviour probably go back as far as the last common ancestor.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,305
Brassicaland
#23
That could well be a thing. We are quite feeble compared to animals the same size as us, and smaller. The largest and strongest adult male today can get killed by a wolf. Some people would struggle with a lynx. So we were forced to expand our capacity by using brain power to invent the weapons that we lack. It's quite miraculous that we actually survived, this far....

And, on topic, there is a precedent in dinosaurs with the brain EQ of otherwise defenceless hadrosaurs increasing as time went on. Probably to cope with a parallel increase in the EQ of tyrannosaurs, so maybe we are lucky that big cats did not increase their EQ as we did.
This reminds me of the scenario here:
In the timeline of the online novel of Mythic Three Kingdoms 《神话版三国》, Australian aborigines were wiped out by hordes of marsupials. Humans thrive in Eurasia and Northern Africa; only large tribes remain in the Americas and Sub-Saharan Africa.
In this world, strong single animals or humans may have qi (energy); organized humans or animals may have cloud qi (energy) that suppresses the qi of the individuals.
Imagine the cloud qi of a horde of bisons.
 
Jun 2012
7,121
Malaysia
#24
Further OT, but the ability to throw rocks in groups was probably useful for a long time, and some have suggested helped to create the brain we have.
Yes, with other animals often, but not always acting as individuals, a group of rock throwing apes would have an advantage. Then of course chimps hunt in groups, so the origins of this behaviour probably go back as far as the last common ancestor.
For one thing, I believe many animals hv a fairly good working understanding of safety in numbers, and the advantages of being in a crowd & interacting with their surroundings on a collective, community basis. A lion or tiger might be pursuing a lone adult monkey, but once that monkey reaches the close proximity of a monkey pack of fifty monkeys, let's just say, the lion or tiger would be normally sensible enough to gv up the chase. It's like, it wud not really relish the idea of being torn to shreds by fifty angry monkeys.

And then, you also hv different animals in a situation of potential conflict or confrontation, and you get a kind of sizing-up-the-enemy scenario. For example, a lion versus a few hyenas. One lion, normally, would consider taking on only three adult hyenas, at the very maximum, but not four. Conversely also, three hyenas might contemplate taking on one lion, but two hyenas normally would not dare it.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,305
Brassicaland
#26
For one thing, I believe many animals hv a fairly good working understanding of safety in numbers, and the advantages of being in a crowd & interacting with their surroundings on a collective, community basis. A lion or tiger might be pursuing a lone adult monkey, but once that monkey reaches the close proximity of a monkey pack of fifty monkeys, let's just say, the lion or tiger would be normally sensible enough to gv up the chase. It's like, it wud not really relish the idea of being torn to shreds by fifty angry monkeys.

And then, you also hv different animals in a situation of potential conflict or confrontation, and you get a kind of sizing-up-the-enemy scenario. For example, a lion versus a few hyenas. One lion, normally, would consider taking on only three adult hyenas, at the very maximum, but not four. Conversely also, three hyenas might contemplate taking on one lion, but two hyenas normally would not dare it.
Even predators consider safety an issue?
Some people are shocked when they videoed that otters may hunt alligators.