WW2 German Production Problems

pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
9,057
#82
Sorry I couldn't answer this point sooner, but the US was unique in creating a council for aircraft production which allocated production contracts to factories serving the militaries needs rather than commercial pressure. It has been commented upon as a form of economic socialism far removed from American sensibilities, but it has to be said, the system worked and whilst I agreed with a lot of what you said, the minor updates issue was common to all mass production vehicles (and still is, ask any manufacturer). The US system tended to get around this because the regional sub-types had minor differences anyway.
how was the different from any other country?
 

pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
9,057
#83
How else am I supposed to react? What you're claiming is as ridiculous as suggesting Hitler created a secret clone army in 1924 that he suddenly used to create the Wehrmacht in 1933, even though the Wehrmacht wasn't created until years later, and was still small until the late 30s.

The SA and SS, pre-33, didn't have combat units at the time and yet you think they constituted "major elements of manpower" injected into the German army. How the heck should anyone halfway knowledgeable about this subject respond to that? What did you expect? A standing ovation?

What was the first Waffen SS unit? When was it formed? I want to know how massive this force was, and how it contributed greatly to the Reichswehr (as the Wehrmacht wasn't even in existence until 1935).

Do you even know what the German army was? I know you probably think Wehrmacht means army, and I know you had no clue what the Reichswehr even was, but the actual ground force organization whose name means army is actually called the Heer. Do you know who the SA and SS operated under? Never the Heer. Not a single SS unit EVER was part of the Heer. At most, during the war, they fell under operational control of certain Heer units, corps, armies, army groups, theater commands, but they were separate organizations, just like how the Spanish, Italian, Hungarian, Romanian units included in Germany field armies were not part of the Heer.

I cannot believe you keep replying...
The German army looked upon the various paramilitaries as potential source of semi trained reserves during the interwar period.
 

pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
9,057
#85
Quote any chief of the Reichswehr saying that.
I know of no such quote. But i have read historians who have said that though iy could take a lot of finding. I'm not inclined to try.

context 100,000 man army. Free Korps. in the early period, then the various Paramilitaries, If there was a war how to expand the military. The Paramilitaries are the obivious solution.

Both the Reichswehr and the Storm troopers wanted to take control of each other.
 
Jul 2016
9,305
USA
#86
I know of no such quote. But i have read historians who have said that though iy could take a lot of finding. I'm not inclined to try.

context 100,000 man army. Free Korps. in the early period, then the various Paramilitaries, If there was a war how to expand the military. The Paramilitaries are the obivious solution.

Both the Reichswehr and the Storm troopers wanted to take control of each other.
The only time paramilitary groups came into fashion was the Freikorps in the Spartacus Rebellion and other civil conflicts. But that wasn't a matter of the army controlling the Freikorps or other groups, as if von Seeckt or another general was commanding them, it was a matter of many junior company level and field grade officers and many soldiers, sometimes the better part of entire units, going AWOL and fighting on their own authority against the communists using arms that were provided by various army officers in league with them.

The SA Troopers were never actually paramilitary, they were a force for brawling and terrorism, they were not military trained. That didn't happen until the 1930s, after Hitler took power and their job was no longer just about protecting the Nazi party, but also an entire nation since the Nazis controlled Germany. But again, not in the 20s.

The plan for increasing the size of the reichswehr was not reliant on paramilitary groups. All ranks would get bumped up. The Reichswehr purposely trained everyone to be able to lead a unit one grade higher than their own. So privates would become sergeants, sergeants would get commissioned as junior officers, etc. That way they could, inside a few months, the time necessary to the new privates and get the necessary weapons, rise from a 12 division army to 21 divisions. But they had no real plan beyond that, as too much was reliant on very long term planning for a major growth, and that could only happen if their civilian leaders were completely on board.
 
Jan 2015
3,285
Front Lines of the Pig War
#89
Sorry I couldn't answer this point sooner, but the US was unique in creating a council for aircraft production which allocated production contracts to factories serving the militaries needs rather than commercial pressure. It has been commented upon as a form of economic socialism far removed from American sensibilities, but it has to be said, the system worked .
How is that different from the British aircraft production under Beaverbrook?
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,491
Sydney
#90
In all the combatant countries the central governments had total control of raw materials
they were doling them to manufacturers as per armed forces requirement
all of them were on a war footing , with equivalent chains of control

the full mobilization argument for Germany is the withdrawal of raw materials and coal from non military companies and the introduction of continuous work shift where they had not been used before
consumer goods were hard hit and pretty much ceased to be made