WWI Navy Launch

Oct 2014
178
California, USA
So, until I was 10, our family lived on a converted WWII era Navy Launch (made by the navy in 1944). My parents lengthened the galley from what it originally was (the back part of the boat was much shorter originally---only had the first window), and of course changed things a lot inside, and painted it yellow.

If anyone knows more about this type of boat and how it was used in WWII, or if by chance anyone who was alive in WWII was on a boat like this, I'd love to know more about how it was used. It was named SNAFU either by the military or the person who owned it before us, not sure.

We sold it to someone in San Diego, and if anyone has SEEN this boat I'd love to know where. It would be great to track it down again.


SNAFU.JPGsnafuME.jpg
 
Oct 2014
178
California, USA
"Situation Normal: All F***** Up". I doubt that was it's original name during WWII navy service ;)
Yeah, most likely. Thought it was definately someone from the navy who named it, I'd guess! My parents always told me it was "Situation Normal All Fouled Up." They also said they didn't rename it because it cost too much to change the name. LOL. My mom wrote the name on the side of the boat in fancy calligraphy! I think that's hilarious, especially now that I know what the F actually stood for!
 
May 2019
218
Earth
My parents always told me it was "Situation Normal All Fouled Up."
I believe "Fouled" was sometimes used back in the day, especially when speaking in polite company. But yes, the other F-word was original to the acronym.

I'm no expert, but you mentioned the back was originally shorter than in the photo, so to me that indicates it wasn't used for mine-laying (they tended to have a longer stern; that's where the mines were released from). It could have been a patrol boat for use in littoral waters. Japanese subs were prowling the west coast during WWII and launched a few attacks on Oregon and California, so the USN maintained a local force of vessels (including "mosquito fleet" boats of that size) for home patrols.

Edit: Sorry, I might be misinterpreting you on the subject of the stern being lengthened. Was the hull that original size? Was it only the cabin that was lengthened at the back?
 
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Tercios Espanoles

Ad Honorem
Mar 2014
6,679
Beneath a cold sun, a grey sun, a Heretic sun...
It seems too large for a ship's boat (60'? 80?), so I reckon it's either a small SP or PC for harbour defence or minesweeping, or even something built for export under lend-lease. I don't recognize that bow shape, however.

EDIT: I'm now thinking it's a Coast Guard cutter of the "Matchbox Fleet" which were about 80', But I'm still not coming across that bow.
 
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Oct 2014
178
California, USA
It seems too large for a ship's boat (60'? 80?), so I reckon it's either a small SP or PC for harbour defence or minesweeping, or even something built for export under lend-lease. I don't recognize that bow shape, however.

EDIT: I'm now thinking it's a Coast Guard cutter of the "Matchbox Fleet" which were about 80', But I'm still not coming across that bow.
It was 50 foot long (thought I put that in the original post and realized I didn't). In the documentation I have when they had it inspected it said it "was of sturdy construction as it hauled aboard other boats." (And I'm not sure if that meant it was hauled aboard other boats or hauled aboard smaller boats (like originally you could fit a small moter boat on the back section, before my parents added to it). It was also described as "diving tender" (but that was how my parents used it--for scuba diving, so I'm not sure if that was just saying thats how they were using it).
 
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Oct 2014
178
California, USA
Edit: Sorry, I might be misinterpreting you on the subject of the stern being lengthened. Was the hull that original size? Was it only the cabin that was lengthened at the back?
The hull was the original size (was always 50' from bow to stern)...it was the galley that was lenthened to create sort of a living room (the galley area used to cut off a few feet after the first window on the lower level...and may not have been any sort of a gally, just a storage space, in it's original form). There was more deck space in the back, not less stern...if that makes sense. I believe guard rails may have also been added.
 
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May 2019
218
Earth
The hull was the original size (was always 50' from bow to stern)...it was the galley that was lenthened to create sort of a living room (the galley area used to cut off a few feet after the first window closest on the lower level...and may not have been any sort of a gally, just a storage space, in it's original form). There was more deck space in the back, not less stern...if that makes sense. I believe guard rails may have also been added.
Yeah, it makes sense. I'd have to agree with Tercios Espanoles, my guess as I said earlier would be something for coastal patrols, or harbour defence.
 
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Jun 2011
312
The Old Dominion
From the shape of the bow, probably a PYc, a private yacht acquired by the Navy and converted a coastal patrol craft . . . there were quite a few of them.
 
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Tercios Espanoles

Ad Honorem
Mar 2014
6,679
Beneath a cold sun, a grey sun, a Heretic sun...
If it's a 50'er, then I agree with R Leonard. I just can't find any navy boats, either for domestic use or lend lease, with that kind of bow.

EDIT: This page has a number of very similar craft. None are a match, but there are a couple that would at least suggest a likely manufacturer: Yachts in Wartime Service | Classic Yacht Association
 
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