Yaghistan, the land of free and unruly

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,376
New Delhi, India
#11
Saw 'Chhota Lahor' and 'Hund' on Google Earth. Not very interesting. Just plains near River Sindh (down-stream Tarbela Dam). The earlier two locations (which I found with the help of Wikipedia) were more interesting - being on the slopes of hills. Read somewhere that Panini lived in the valley of River Kurram. They say Alexander crossed Sindh near Hund.

BTW, Hindus consider Panini to be a demi-God and Sanskrit scholars have no hesitation in calling him as Bhagawan Panini. :)
 
Last edited:
Aug 2014
1,234
pakistan
#12
Saw 'Chhota Lahor' and 'Hund' on Google Earth. Not very interesting. Just plains near River Sindh (down-stream Tarbela Dam). The earlier two locations (which I found with the help of Wikipedia) were more interesting - being on the slopes of hills. Read somewhere that Panini lived in the valley of River Kurram. They say Alexander crossed Sindh near Hund.

BTW, Hindus consider Panini to be a demi-God and Sanskrit scholars have no hesitation in calling him as Bhagawan Panini. :)
Not interesting scenery-wise , but these boring plain areas have rich history. Hund was the capital of Gandhara under Hindu Shahis. Its also the site where Khwarzim Shah's army made last stand against Genghis Khan army and that famous jump to river Indus
 

Shaheen

Ad Honorem
May 2011
2,529
Sweden
#13
Not interesting scenery-wise , but these boring plain areas have rich history. Hund was the capital of Gandhara under Hindu Shahis. Its also the site where Khwarzim Shah's army made last stand against Genghis Khan army and that famous jump to river Indus
Also where Alexander and his army crossed the Indus I believe.
 
Apr 2017
12
Hel
#15
By Khan Barmazid (me)


Pashtun highlands in the past have been called Yaghistan which means the land of the free and unruly (Yaghi means uncontrollable and unmanageable). Amir Abdur Rahman Khan referred to the tribal belt between British India and Afghanistan as Yaghistan in his autobiography. Colonel Brazier Creagh of the Indian Army, who visited the area in 1893-4, wrote, "When went to the frontier it was Yaghistan ; it was a forbidden land, and no Englishman had ever been there before.....It was impossible to go [inside] and if you did your bones would be left there.”

Yaghistan, referred to as Roh in medieval times (Roh means mountains) was the land where no man was above another. They were not subjects of any body and they were not the part of any kingdom of a king according to Afsana-i-Shahan. The fiercely independent Pakhtun tribes of Yaghistan remained independent during the Ghaznavid period and Ghaznavid sources reveal that Turkish Sultan Mahmud of Ghazni attacked Afghans who used to raid his frontier districts and killed large numbers of them but Afghans remained unruly and his successors had struggle with ever rebellious Afghans. These Afghan tribes of mountains maintained their independence during Ghurid, Mongol, Timurid, Delhi Sultanate, Mughal , Durrani and Sikh periods and could not be forced to pay any taxes. Lavish subsidies were paid by the Mughals as protection money to keep the passes through Yaghistan open. In 19th century (before 1893) the tribes of Yaghistan did not belong either to the British raj or Amir of Kabul.
If only "free" and "unruly" natives of Yaghistan had read a book or two (besides Quran) then maybe their land would not be the literal Detroit of Asia hahaha

Oh well, one has to feel pride for one's own people at some level to be emotionally healthy
 
Last edited:
Aug 2014
1,234
pakistan
#17
If only "free" and "unruly" natives of Yaghistan had read a book or two (besides Quran) then maybe their land would not be the literal Detroit of Asia hahaha

Oh well, one has to feel pride for one's own people at some level to be emotionally healthy
Actually Pashto literature and music prospered in these mountains of Yaghistan. The region was center of Roshniya insurgency in 16th century and they have produced many Pashto poets.
 
Dec 2018
1
Pakistan
#19
By Khan Barmazid (me)


Pashtun highlands in the past have been called Yaghistan which means the land of the free and unruly (Yaghi means uncontrollable and unmanageable). Amir Abdur Rahman Khan referred to the tribal belt between British India and Afghanistan as Yaghistan in his autobiography. Colonel Brazier Creagh of the Indian Army, who visited the area in 1893-4, wrote, "When went to the frontier it was Yaghistan ; it was a forbidden land, and no Englishman had ever been there before.....It was impossible to go [inside] and if you did your bones would be left there.”

Yaghistan, referred to as Roh in medieval times (Roh means mountains) was the land where no man was above another. They were not subjects of any body and they were not the part of any kingdom of a king according to Afsana-i-Shahan. The fiercely independent Pakhtun tribes of Yaghistan remained independent during the Ghaznavid period and Ghaznavid sources reveal that Turkish Sultan Mahmud of Ghazni attacked Afghans who used to raid his frontier districts and killed large numbers of them but Afghans remained unruly and his successors had struggle with ever rebellious Afghans. These Afghan tribes of mountains maintained their independence during Ghurid, Mongol, Timurid, Delhi Sultanate, Mughal , Durrani and Sikh periods and could not be forced to pay any taxes. Lavish subsidies were paid by the Mughals as protection money to keep the passes through Yaghistan open. In 19th century (before 1893) the tribes of Yaghistan did not belong either to the British raj or Amir of Kabul.
Kohistan & Chitral are missing as well as the Darel & Tangir ( Indo Aryan/ Dardic Tribes) which nowadays, is considered an interim part of Gilgit Baltistan region (Disputed).
 

Shaheen

Ad Honorem
May 2011
2,529
Sweden
#20
@Azad67

Is the word "yaghi" a different pronunciation of "baghi" which means the same (rebellious)?

Also with the tribal lands being integrated into Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province do you think the culture in these parts will change gradually?
 

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