Your Favourite Biome/Landscape

Solidaire

Ad Honorem
Aug 2009
5,423
Athens, Greece
#11
Forested mountains (preferably with evergreens), with their highlights being gorges around streams and rivers.

Images from Vikos gorge, in northern Greece, the deepest one in the world:







I also find alpine areas interesting. Not as pretty as the forested areas, but compelling in a strange way. Glaciers and alpine lakes being my favourite sight.

"Dragon lakes" in northern Greece:






 
Sep 2013
7,435
Ireland
#12
I love the coastal Cliffs off the West or North coast of Ireland which meander back into a lush green landscape of rolling hills, valleys and woodlands. Coastal cliffs anywhere are my favourite.

 
Oct 2014
859
Westeros
#13
Even though there's a lot of bugs, I have to go with Wetlands as my favorite type of biome. I think the main reason is that I just love how they are absolutely teeming with life. I also enjoy heat and humidity and how you cleanse your system by sweating out toxins and drinking lots of water.
It's probably in my DNA! Many evolutionary biologists believe we evolved from a wetlands-type environment.

https://www.google.com/search?q=wet...CAYQ_AUoAQ#tbm=isch&q=beautiful+wetlands+pics
 
Oct 2014
5,123
On the prowl.
#14
Many of these areas are just beautiful, and it is difficult for me to pick. I have lived in a few countries and many states here in the US, and also visited many more countries. I have a great love and respect for nature and the natural beauty of our planet, and I fell in love with each area I lived in.

I guess, if I could only pick one, then it would be areas with mountains. I loved the Alps in Europe, the little villages alongside a mountain stream, the smell of wood burning in fireplaces, animals grazing on bright green grass, the way huge thunderstorms could be seen pelting one side of the mountain but not the side I was on, etc.

The mountains in the US are also very beautiful, and I especially loved the autumn colors in the mountains of New England. I liked the red tint of the rocky hills, mesas, and small mountains in the Southwest, and also the wonderful scenery out at Crater Lake in Oregon (fishing in the Rogue River where it was hot, but with huge piles of snow at our campsite up on the mountain).

One image that I loved from Afghanistan came when I was flying in the back of a Chinook, right at daybreak, with the sky all purple/red/pink/orange all over in different places and on various clouds, and those mountains so steep on either side of us as the bird zigzagged around over a stream. The whole scene looked so peaceful, a stark contrast to what had been happening that night.

Yeah, I think the mountains have always impressed me the most. Even more so than living along the Pacific -- which was a powerful site in itself -- in the desert of Arizona, the prairies of the Midwest (though I will always love those big rivers), and the non-mountainous areas I lived in outside the USA.
 
Apr 2019
3
Lakewood, CO
#15
I love the landscapes and biomes of Scandinavia. It would be interesting to see the ancient opposition and wars in natural landscapes but in modern gear. How do you imagine an ancient Roman, but in modern sneakers with a gun?
 
Apr 2019
3
Lakewood, CO
#17
Unlike the ancient Romans, modern man can just buy any clothes and shoes. We do not even need to go out for this. We can simply use online services for this. You can discover more [MOD EDIT: Oh no you can't] about the best shoes of the ancient Romans, but you will never know how hard it was to find it. You will never feel their life. It is very intriguing. Now you can pick up any clothes for all purposes (sports, volleyball, basketball, pickleball). Most people then walked in pieces of cloth, not in shoes, but they lived fully and did not complain.
 
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specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,052
Australia
#18
I'm interested in Natural History and I'm going to be studying Conservation and Wildlife Management later this year, and something I always ask people is what their favourite biome/landscape or habitat type is. You can give more than one answer.

My favourite is deciduous woodland. I spend a lot of time in woods and they are comfortable to me. I'm chiefly interested in the history of woodlands in Britain and I like to imagine if I were a Mesolithic hunter-gatherer in the new Pine/Birch woods of the Scottish Highlands just as the climate is starting to warm. That is my favourite period of prehistory. My favourite woodland is the Caledonian Pine Forest of Abernethy.

My second favourite biome or landscape type would have to be mountains and moorland. More and more I find geology and the physiography of uplands interesting. Reading about the formation of Glencoe, for example, is fascinating. There is nothing more evocative of the scale of nature than rugged mountains.

It's hard to pick a third, but I'd probably say fresh water lochs...

What are your choices?
1. Where I grew up, played, wandered around and camped out in
 

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,052
Australia
#19
hmmm ... posting and editing difficulties


1 ... south of Sydney Basin , a sandstone regolith , coastal coves and beaches, creeks and waterholes, with littoral rainforest, snaking inland, interspaced with ridges of heathland and wildflowers.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_National_Park-wales-australia-AF3GWC.jpg

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2. Where I live now , sub-tropical rainforest , in an ancient subduction fault , coastal river valley ...

Biome ;

"The Gondwana Rainforests of Australia, formerly known as the Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves, are the most extensive area of subtropical rainforest in the world.[1] Collectively, the rainforests are a World Heritage Site with fifty separate reserves totalling 366,500 hectares (906,000 acres) from Newcastle to Brisbane.[2]

The Gondwana Rainforests are so-named because the fossil record indicates that when Gondwana existed it was covered by rainforests containing the same kinds of species that are living today. Not all Gondwanan rainforests in Australia are located in the New South Wales – Queensland region; the largest Gondwanan rainforest in Australia is located in Tasmania's Tarkine wilderness. The number of visitors to the Gondwana rainforest reserves in New South Wales and Queensland is about 2 million per year.[1] "

Gondwana Rainforests - Wikipedia

also see

The Gondwana Rainforests of Australia | NSW National Parks



Locality :

Dorrigo National Park | NSW National Parks


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It can get a bit wet though

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good day


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bad day


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specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,052
Australia
#20
I'm interested in Natural History and I'm going to be studying Conservation and Wildlife Management later this year, and something I always ask people is what their favourite biome/landscape or habitat type is. You can give more than one answer.

My favourite is deciduous woodland. I spend a lot of time in woods and they are comfortable to me. I'm chiefly interested in the history of woodlands in Britain and I like to imagine if I were a Mesolithic hunter-gatherer in the new Pine/Birch woods of the Scottish Highlands just as the climate is starting to warm. That is my favourite period of prehistory. My favourite woodland is the Caledonian Pine Forest of Abernethy.

My second favourite biome or landscape type would have to be mountains and moorland. More and more I find geology and the physiography of uplands interesting. Reading about the formation of Glencoe, for example, is fascinating. There is nothing more evocative of the scale of nature than rugged mountains.

It's hard to pick a third, but I'd probably say fresh water lochs...

What are your choices?
You might be interested in this as well, regarding geology;

Mills of years ago 'prot-Oz' was part of Gondwanaland. As it moved towards present position the coastal area, related to this area here, back then, the coast would have been where Bourke NSW is, and that would have been located near the South Pole.

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( Brisbane Qld. is just north of 'Gold Coast' )

Marine deposits and terrestrial erosion built out the coastal shelf, to the south the 'Nambucca Beds' and to the north the 'Demon Block' a larger 'small massif ' ( :) ) . They squished, the Nambucca beds being forced down in subduction beneath the Demon Block, that had its south edge uplifted in an escarpment . All this was happening off the coast, undersea. Later, due to movements , uplift, ocean levels, etc it rose and water erosion continued to form it. There was a volcanic episode and then that all eroded (mostly ) forming a rich fertile kraznozen 'fluffy'clay on the plateau 'red soil' ... good potato country

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It is unusual in that its watershed slopes away from the escarpment. Over time the iron rich basalt, in high rainfall, with restricted runoff weathering and oxidization , etc. formed the soil.

Running north south is the Great Dividing Range and it comes the closest ( with the exception of the Daintree in Qld. ) to the coast near Coffs Harbor ; this and the escarpment form a barrier between many forms of flora and fauna variations of 'north south sub species' , but in this small area they can cross breed, making some unusual hybrids. I have seen birds that do not appear in any Aussie bird books , I was eventually able to indentify them as hybrids.

Its also a place where we get whale migrations near the coast .
 

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