Your favourite comedy sketches

#86
I loved Young Ones
don't remember the clips shared here, was there a second season?

"It's Harry the Bastard."
"You owe me five hundred quid."
"Wow. What a complete bastard."
The Dino & Dicky thing is from the first season, whereas Harry the Bastard is from the second, so perhaps you haven't seen the first. The song with Cliff Richard was a separate thing from the show itself.
 
Likes: sailorsam
Dec 2011
2,350
#87
I think this is hilarious - see what you think
Monty Python's 4 Yorkshiremen sketch, I wonder if people outside of UK (or even young people in UK) can laugh at it. A few decades ago there were some working class older men around (and they wouldn't have been really old, in their 40s and 50s) who would declare, with apparent pride, how much they had suffered in the past, and how relatively easy it was now (then) for the young. Now I know that, with depressions and world wars, many really DID have very hard lives (not helped by the common habits of smoking and drinking) - but I still do find the sketch very funny.
 
#88
I think this is hilarious - see what you think
Monty Python's 4 Yorkshiremen sketch, I wonder if people outside of UK (or even young people in UK) can laugh at it. A few decades ago there were some working class older men around (and they wouldn't have been really old, in their 40s and 50s) who would declare, with apparent pride, how much they had suffered in the past, and how relatively easy it was now (then) for the young. Now I know that, with depressions and world wars, many really DID have very hard lives (not helped by the common habits of smoking and drinking) - but I still do find the sketch very funny.
Both great sketches. I'm an Australian, and I know many other Australians who love the Four Yorkshiremen sketch. I think the whole 'the youth of today don't know what we went through/we had it tough' attitude is well known throughout at least the Anglophone world. The fact that they're working class Yorkshiremen doesn't hinder this, since I think the phenomenon transcends the specifically British context being parodied. Take for example Cook and Moore's 'A Spot of the Usual Trouble'. The sketch is set in a working-class London context, but the broader concept, one-upmanship, seems timeless:


That being said, I don't doubt that the Four Yorkshiremen sketch would have been especially funny in the post-war decades; likewise the Aftermyth of War sketch in post 61.
 
Jul 2011
5,938
Belgium
#89
Well, it's not sketches per sé, but I'm very fond of the french Comedy series "Kaamelott", which, for it's first 4 or 5 seasons consisted of small 5 minute episodes.
It's a wonderful comedic view on the myth of King Arthur.
The official Kaamelott channel has all seasons available on youtube with English subtitles, but I'm not sure how the humor will translate from French to English.
 

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