Your Favourite Historians?

Feb 2019
933
Serbia
Who is your favourite historian(s)? By historian I mean someone who writes books examining history, makes documentaries or contributes to the study of history in any other way. Both dead and living historians count.
 
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Edric Streona

Ad Honorem
Feb 2016
4,513
Japan
Favourites.

Donald Featherstone.
Jac Weller.
Rene Chartrand are winning the battle for space on my shelf.
 
Nov 2018
351
Denmark
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, the old gossip.
His De vita Caesarum is just wonderfull .It may not be true, but it is certainly a good story.
 
Jul 2019
650
New Jersey
Samuel Eliot Morison.

His Oxford History of the United States is very readable and informative, and his two-volume The European Discovery of the New World is absolutely indispensable if one wishes to study the European naval exploration of the Americas from Columbus through the Elizabethan era. I haven't read his Columbus: Admiral of the Ocean Sea, but I have heard it's quite good as well.
 
Oct 2016
139
Ashland
Samuel Eliot Morison.

His Oxford History of the United States is very readable and informative, and his two-volume The European Discovery of the New World is absolutely indispensable if one wishes to study the European naval exploration of the Americas from Columbus through the Elizabethan era. I haven't read his Columbus: Admiral of the Ocean Sea, but I have heard it's quite good as well.
The last mentioned is well-worth reading, though it shows its age a bit.; e.g., Morison did not fully appreciate that the 'Putun' Maya whom Colon met in 1502 in the Gulf of Honduras were quite civilized descendants of the folks who built the cities of the Mesoamerican Classic and Post-classic. I wish that the Admiral of the Ocean Sea could have seen the ruins of, say, Chichen Itza; how would that have accorded with his mistaken impression as to his whereabouts?:winktongue:

Apparently the author was related to the lead singer of The Doors (RIP). Family Tradition, I suppose.
***OT
The first serious History I read was a multi-volume A Study of History by Arnold Toynbee. It very much stimulated my interest in the subject.
True, there is much goofy, wishful thinking in his overview (though, for all anyone knows, there may indeed be a Grand Design at work; that would explain a lot.)
Also, his List of Autochthonous Civilizations should probably be shorn of the Norse: imo, they would be a better fit for his 'External Proletariat' of the Med.

Have a happy and safe Independence Day!! and stay :cool:
 
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Jul 2019
650
New Jersey
The last mentioned is well-worth reading, though it shows its age a bit.; e.g., Morison did not fully appreciate that the 'Putun' Maya whom Colon met in 1502 in the Gulf of Honduras were quite civilized descendants of the folks who built the cities of the Mesoamerican Classic and Post-classic. I wish that the Admiral of the Ocean Sea could have seen the ruins of, say, Chichen Itza; how would that have accorded with his mistaken impression as to his whereabouts?:winktongue:

Apparently the author was related to the lead singer of The Doors (RIP). Family Tradition, I suppose.
***OT
The first serious History I read was a multi-volume A Study of History by Arnold Toynbee. It very much stimulated my interest in the subject.
True, there is much goofy, wishful thinking in his overview (though, for all anyone knows, there may indeed be a Grand Design at work; that would explain a lot.)
Also, his List of Autochthonous Civilizations should probably be shorn of the Norse: imo, they would be a better fit for his 'External Proletariat' of the Med.

Have a happy and safe Independence Day!! and stay :cool:
Morison's writing in general is a little old - in his American history he bemoans the newfangled knee-length skirts which were eroding the old social mores. Some people get offended by this sort of thing, but as a pretty conservative traditionalist I find it rather charming.