Your oppinion on odd skeleton position found in Roman tomb

Yôḥānān

Ad Honorem
Feb 2012
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Portugal
Based on Ario's link another possibility would be a connection with the god Cernunnos; according to Wiki:"Interpretations of his role vary from seeing him as a god of animals, nature and fertility to a god of travel, commerce and bi-directionality." It also mentions his representation in a 1st century Roman column at Paris. The god was worshiped by Celts which also included Celtiberians.
Being totaly ignorant on these issues could this be a form of deification of this man or something like that? Wandering philosophers could have a particular connection to a god like Apolonius to Asclepius and end up being deified after a pious life.
If this could make sense at other levels it would certainly feel more within the context than my previous atempt to orientalize the wandering philosophers.

 
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Yôḥānān

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Feb 2012
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I'm glad your turning towards my "he's an interpretive dancer" theory. After all, that can't be disproved either
But you are right Olleus, this was all a vulgar display of curiosity and a terrible way to start the year.
 

Todd Feinman

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Oct 2013
6,950
Planet Nine, Oregon
Other seated burials lave been found (the Gauls apparently used to do it, and LaTene culture):

Also, it isn't an uncommon way of sitting --it just happens to resemble an Padmasana
 
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Dan Howard

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Aug 2014
5,153
Australia
Not at all Olleus, but if you want to provide a serious explantion for your theory that fits the description you are welcome.
His theory is just as credible as yours. This thread started at embarrassing and is now delusional. The most likely explanation is Todd's. It is a simple seated burial, which was common in many cultures.
 
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Aug 2018
697
london
His theory is just as credible as yours. This thread started at embarrassing and is now delusional. The most likely explanation is Todd's. It is a simple seated burial, which was common in many cultures.
Lol Mr Serious, your theory was that the burial position was the result of an earthquake.
 

Yôḥānān

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Feb 2012
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Portugal
Other seated burials lave been found (the Gauls apparently used to do it, and LaTene culture):

Also, it isn't an uncommon way of sitting --it just happens to resemble an Padmasana
Shouldn't be wasting time discussing the shape the shadows take but since the year already started on the wrong foot, seated burial position is like those below:



 

Yôḥānān

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Feb 2012
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Portugal
Conclusion, the burial position from the OP is a perfectly common position that ocurred in many cultures for which nobody is able to provide a similar ocurrence or an explanation that fits the context.
 

Yôḥānān

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Feb 2012
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Antyesti
Burial In Hinduism: Apart from the cremation method there are large sects in Hinduism which follow burial of the dead. The preparatory rituals are more or less similar to cremation viz, washing the body, applying vibuthi or chandam on the forehead of the deceased etc, but instead of cremating, the deceased is buried. The body is either placed in sleeping position or in some Shaivite and tribal traditions is in sitting position legs folded and arms resting on the thigh simulating meditative position. The burial pit is prepared in the community burial ground called Shamshana, usually situated outside the city or village. Some affluent will bury their dead in the own field. The burial pit for sleeping position is generally three feet width and six feet in length and for sitting position it is three feet by three feet. As a thumb rule in all the sects invariable the saints are buried in sitting position in a separate place where later on a Samadhi is built which becomes a place of worship.

Buddhist Funeral

While mummification does occur as a funeral custom in a variety of Buddhist traditions, it is not a common practice; cremation is more common. Many Mahayana Buddhist monks noted in their last testaments a desire for their students to bury them sitting in a lotus posture, put into a vessel full of coal, wood, paper and/or lime and surrounded by bricks, and be exhumed after approximately three years.[18] The preserved bodies would be painted with paints and adorned with gold. Many were so respected that they were preserved by their students. They were called "Corporeal Bodhisattvas", similar to that of the Roman Catholic incorruptibles. Many were destroyed during the cultural revolution in China, some were preserved, such as Huineng, the Sixth Patriarch of Ch'an Buddhism and Kim Kiaokak, a Korean Buddhist monk revered as a manifestation of Ksitigarbha, and some have been discovered recently: one such was the Venerable Tzu Hang in Taiwan; another was the Venerable Yuet Kai in Hong Kong.

How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth?
 
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